Melbourne Law School - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 419
  • Item
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    THE BRUMMAGEM COUP THE START OF SELF-GOVERNMENT IN VICTORIA
    Waugh, J (ROYAL HISTORICAL SOC VICTORIA, 2006-11-01)
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Contempt of Parliament in Victoria
    Waugh, J (Adelaide Law Review Association, 2005)
    The wide powers of State Parliaments to punish members and outsiders vary from State to State. Authorities on contempt of Parliament have compared the different jurisdictions, but there has been no specific study of contempt of the Victorian Parliament. Its powers are different from those of the Commonwealth, New South Wales and Tasmanian parliaments, and it has a distinctive record of little-known contempt cases. This article provides an overview of the Victorian Parliament’s powers and the way they have been used.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    New Federation History
    Waugh, J (Melbourne University Law Review Association, 2000)
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Framing the First Victorian Constitution, 1853–5
    Waugh, J (Faculty of Law, Monash University, 1997)
    As the approaching centenary of federation renews interest in Australian constitutional history, it is timely to examine the colonial constitutions that were current law for the framers of the Commonwealth Constitution. They were the result of the first Australian exercises in constitution-making. Many of their provisions are still in force. This article describes the framing of one of the new constitutions of the 1850s, the Victorian Constitution Act of 1855. The work of the politicians who dominated Victoria at the start of the gold rush, it created the framework for the constitutional crises of the 1860s and 1870s and remains the source of many provisions of the Constitution Act 1975 (Vic).
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    The Victorian Government and the Jurisdiction of the Supreme Court
    Waugh, J (Law School, University of New South Wales, 1996)
    Recent events have directed attention to the place of the Supreme Court of Victoria in the State constitutional structure, as argument has emerged in the press and elsewhere about legislation reducing the Court's jurisdiction. This article considers the legislation which has led to this controversy, the significance of Victoria's distinctive constitutional entrenchment of Supreme Court jurisdiction, and other aspects of the constitutional position of the Supreme Court.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    The doctrine of 'strict compliance' in the Italian legal system
    Arban, E (The University of Arizona, 2005)
    In recent years, courts all over the world have been called upon more and more often to resolve disputes involving transactions made through letters of credit. This paper analyzes the doctrine of strict compliance in letters of credit in the Italian legal system in light of some decisions issued by Italian courts over the past fifty years. It is not the intent of this paper to explain in detail the "technical" function of letters of credit, since the mechanism underlying this trade tool is already known: the buyer of merchandise asks a bank (issuing bank) to issue a letter of credit payable to the seller of the merchandise (beneficiary) upon presentation of certain documents tendered by the seller to the issuing bank. In international transactions, a separate bank often confirms the obligation at the beneficiary's place of business (confirming bank). When the required documents, complying on their face with the conditions of the credit, are tendered, the bank honors its undertaking. Due to its characteristics, the letter of credit is used for the most part among merchants residing in different countries.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Principles of Contract Law
    PATERSON, J ; ROBERTSON, AJ ; HEFFEY, P (Lawbook Co, 2005)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Protection of Employees in a Transmission of Business: What is Left in the Wake of Work Choices and Subsequent Statutory Amendments
    Hardy, T (Centre for Employment and Labour Relations Law, 2007)
    Regulation of the employment relationship in the context of a transmission of business has undergone substantial revision as a result of the Workplace Relations Amendment (WorkChoices) Act 2005 (Cth), and more recently, the Workplace Relations Amendment (A Stronger Safety Net) Act 2007 (Cth). The first part of this paper reviews the statutory treatment of transmission of business in the past and considers the traditional justification for regulatory intervention in this area. The focus then turns to a detailed examination of the new statutory provisions and analyses the possible impetus for the changes, as well as identifying potential shortcomings. Finally, it looks at recent amendments relating to the application of duress in connection with Australian Workplace Agreements. It is argued that, despite the growing body of case law in this area, statutory intervention was necessary in order to ensure that, in a transmission of business, the obligations of employers were clearly prescribed and the market position of employees was properly protected.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Left Out in the Cold: Homelessness and Anti-Discrimination Law
    Hardy, T (Council of Homeless Persons, 2005)
    Anti-discrimination legislation has long been accepted as an integral part of Australian law and culture. However, the current legal framework at both Commonwealth and State levels fails to adequately protect people who are homeless, unemployed or in receipt of social security benefits. (1) This omission in the law masks the fact that discrimination against these groups is deeply ingrained and currently lawful. Not only does this seem to indicate a lack of awareness on the part of the legislature, it also seems to demonstrate ignorance of the fact that homeless people, although impoverished, possess basic human rights.