School of Historical and Philosophical Studies - Research Publications

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    A Re-Evaluation of the Iconography of the Etruscan Bronze Lamp of Cortona
    Alburz, R ; Tol, GW (De Gruyter, 2024)
    This paper addresses unresolved issues in the study of the enigmatic iconography of the Etruscan bronze lamp of Cortona. Drawing upon literary sources and additional iconographic evidence, issues with previous interpretations of the lamp will be discussed. Subsequently, new identities are proposed for the key figures on the lamp, concluding that its iconography is a manifestation of Dionysian thiasus and that the lamp was a cult object associated with the mystery cult of Dionysus. This paper will also contribute to the refutation of the concept of “Dionysism without Dionysus” in Archaic Etruria.
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    Preliminary Report on the 2018-2019 Survey
    Terrana, T ; Heywood, J ; Driessen, J (Presses universitaires de Louvain, 2022-01-19)
    This volume, in two parts, is the fifth and last preliminary report on the excavations conducted at the Bronze Age site of Kephali tou Agiou Antoniou at Sissi in the nomos of Lasithi, Crete.
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    Painted Larnakes of the Late Minoan III Period: Funerary Iconography and the Stimulation of Memory
    Heywood, J ; Davis, B ; Borgna, E ; Caloi, I ; Carinci, F ; Laffineur, R (Peeters Publishers, 2019)
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    Cultural responses to the migration of the barn swallow in Europe
    Green, A (ANU Press, 2019-05-09)
    This paper investigates the place of barn swallows in European folklore and science from the Bronze Age to the nineteenth century. It takes the swallow’s natural migratory patterns as a starting point, and investigates how different cultural groups across this period have responded to the bird’s departure in autumn and its subsequent return every spring. While my analysis is focused on classical European texts, including scientifc and theological writings, I have also considered the swallow’s representation in art. The aim of this article is to build a longue durée account of how beliefs about the swallow have evolved over time, even as the bird’s migratory patterns have remained the same. As I argue, the influence of classical texts on medieval and Renaissance thought in Europe allows us to consider a temporal progression (and sometimes regression) in the way barn swallow migration was explained and understood.
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    Tracing Breton footprints from Fleury to Reims: the codicological evidence for the exegetical compilation in Orléans 182 and Reims 395
    Corrigan, S (CNRS Éditions, 2023)
    The focus of this article is a compilation of biblical exegesis, here entitled Glossae Floriacenses in Vetus et Nouum Testamentum, that ranges from short explanatory glosses to more extensive passages of interpretation, and also incorporates two independent works in their entirety: Adrevald of Fleury’s De benedictionibus patriarcharum and the Venerable Bede’s Nomina regionum atque locorum de Actibus apostolorum. The Glossae Floriacenses also preserve multiple layers of Old Breton glosses (main text, interlinear, marginal additions), as well as several Old English glosses. This dynamic work survives in two codices, Orléans, Médiathèque, MS 183, and Reims, Bibliothèque municipale, MS 395. The methodology employed here involves a detailed survey of these codicological contexts in order to expand our understanding of the transmission and use of the Glossae Floriacenses. In the case of Orléans 182, there is strong evidence for Fleury as the provenance of the codex as a whole, but this analysis also evidences substantial interactions with nearby regions, particularly Brittany and Auxerre. In the case of Reims 395, several manuscript in the codex date to the eleventh century, and include the Glossae Floriacenses, Odo of Cluny’s Sermo de sancto Benedicto, and a range of works dedicated to the celebration of Mary Magdalene. This grouping indicates links of transmission between a number of Loire Valley and Burgundy regions, particularly Brittany, Fleury, Cluny, Auxerre, and Vézelay.
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    ‘I Don’t Want Bullumwaal to be Forgotten’: How the Community Led the Conservation of a 1897 Stage Curtain in Bullumwaal (East Gippsland, Australia)
    Cotte, S ; Fleischer, N ; Hocking, J ; Vardy, S (Taylor & Francis, 2024)
    Conservation practice increasingly seeks to include community participation. This article reflects on such a collaborative process, through the case study of the community-driven conservation of a stage curtain painted in 1897 for the Mechanics Hall of Bullumwaal, a remote township in the state of Victoria (Australia). From fundraising efforts and navigating grant applications to managing the conservation project, the challenges faced by the local community in order to conserve their curtain and keep it in situ are examined in light of current heritage preservation policies and practices. Close collaboration with the conservators and flexibility with all preconceived plans resulted in a successful negotiated outcome that respected both community values and ethics of preservation. Social events are now planned to advertise the curtain’s presence and attract people to the township. The conservation treatment also triggered more research by local historians, expanding knowledge about the place and its people and opening the Bullumwaal community to new connections with other parts of Victoria. This case illustrates the importance of living cultural heritage within a community and conservation’s contribution to strengthen identity, social cohesion and sense of place through the preservation process.
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    Esteban Villanueva’sThe Basi Revolt paintings of Ilocos: Unlocking their material evidence
    Tse, N ; Balarbar, RA ; Esguerra, R ; Labrador, AMPTP (National Museum of the Philippines, 2020-11-01)
    The series of fourteen works that comprise Esteban Villanueva’s The Basi Revolt is examined historically and physically to have a clear idea of the paintings’ material authenticity, particularly necessary for conservation treatment. Among the questions dealt with involved the production and authorship, the extent of variation of the surface and paint layers, as well as the pigment types across all fourteen works. As The Basi Revolt is a series that depicts an important historical event in the Philippines, the course of conservation needs to be assessed as a whole, to reinstate a unified visual narrative. Methods used to attempt to answer these involved the examination of available historical records and the use of reflected raking and ultra-violet lights, microscopic magnification, and elemental analysis. To have a much stronger evidence-based understanding of The Basi Revolt, as well as of other early 19th century paintings by Filipino artists, setting up a database of the range of materials available and used during that time is essential for their conservation.
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    The potential role of citizen conservation in re-shaping approaches to murals in an urban context
    Kyi, C ; Tse, N ; Khazam, S (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2016)
    Public visual spaces, populated by a blend of community murals, unauthorised street art, and historic painted mercantile signs, are often the mark of an urban environment that is both progressive and eclectic. Changes in the aesthetic and cultural value of these urban mural forms have led to an increase in the appreciation and, in some instances, promotion of their artistic merit and cultural significance as examples of public art. However, examining the significance of these works, with a view to implementing a conservation approach is problematic. This is due to a number of practical and theoretical considerations that are primarily a result of the ephemeral existence of urban murals outside conventional exhibition spaces, and issues associated with their often fragmented ownership and uncertain authorship. Consequently, larger thinking on the interpretation, conservation assessment, and advocacy for the conservation of urban murals are required. Key to defining and implementing such strategies is contextualising the public visual spaces that these murals occupy and, as part of this, the local and wider communities’ perception of these murals as culturally significant objects as well as fostering awareness and understanding of appropriate measures aimed at their conservation. This paper examines the role of citizen science, or crowd-sourcing, of local community members in establishing a conservation dialogue and generating conservation- relevant data on urban murals. It looks specifically at a project involving a collection of in situ historic painted mercantile signs — also known as ghost signs — in the City of Port Phillip, Melbourne, Australia. The project fostered the establishment of an informed and open dialogue between conservation specialists and participants from the local community on the significance of local ghost signs whilst transferring knowledge on conservation processes and assessment methods. Working directly with community members, a programme was designed in which conservation and community knowledge of these urban art forms, could be collected and exchanged across digital platforms. This enabled researchers to examine how citizen science can be utilised as a research tool as well as a means to advocate for the conservation of collections of urban murals. It created the opportunity to consider the role of non-specialists and shared authorities in the collection and collation of conservation- relevant data and how information generated from what we call citizen conservation projects, can inform the way in which conservators evaluate and prioritize the conservation of urban cultural heritage. The data gathered and interpreted proved to be the most effective means of ‘conserving’ these often ephemeral forms of cultural material.