School of Historical and Philosophical Studies - Research Publications

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    ‘Australia-China Collaboration on the Art History, Restoration and Conservation Study of Mural Paintings’
    Eckfeld, T ; Tse, N ; Kyi, C ; Xiaoxiao, W ; Jing, Y ; Jiafang, L ; Daiyun, L ; Zhou, T (Wenwu chubanshe, 2020)
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    James Stirling, first governor of Western Australia and imperial investor
    Arnott, G (Western Australian Legacies of British Slavery Project in collaboration with National Centre for Biography, 2021-03-18)
    Admiral James Stirling arrived on Noongar land in 1829 to proclaim it the British colony of Western Australia. Officially, he represented the British government. Unofficially, he represented the commercial interests of his family, a collection of British naval officers, East India Company administrators and directors, imperial merchants, shipping magnates, their wives and their descendants. Stirling pursued the colony as an investment opportunity, first with the Colonial Office and then through land selections, the manipulation of market conditions and private capital-raising schemes. This pursuit was shaped by three, interrelated social phenomena. Firstly, numerous strands of his family had become wealthy through transatlantic and Caribbean slavery. Secondly, British government incentives for establishing a colony on the western side of Australia strengthened at the same time as it was shifting away from the ‘slave colonies’ and certain forms of unfree labour. And third, this shift placed pressure on the Stirling family to secure new income streams to maintain affluence and power. This seminar will explore these dynamics and ask: in what ways does the intergenerational biographical method expand and enliven, or alternatively risk reducing, our understanding of the legacies of British slavery in the Australian settler colonies?
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    National Biographies and Transnational Lives: legacies of British slavery across the empire
    Laidlaw, Z ; Arnott, G (Western Australian Legacies of British Slavery Project in collaboration with National Centre for Biography, 2021-04-01)
    Britain’s involvement in the slave trade and slavery affected the lives and fortunes of many nineteenth-century immigrants to the Australian colonies. Some transferred capital directly from plantation economies to newly burgeoning settler colonial societies; for others, the connections were more diffuse. As historians have shown, the Australian colonies provided individual immigrants with an opportunity to refashion their existing reputations or even create them afresh. At the same time, collective colonial and settler identities were asserted in cultural, social, economic and political fora. This seminar explores dictionaries of biography as sites for the mutual constitution of individual and national (or colonial) identities. Alongside a consideration of how slavery and the slavery business feature in the Australian Dictionary of Biography and the Biographical Dictionary of Western Australians, it explores how Britain and its other settler colonies remembered, forgot, or suppressed, the legacies of British slavery in their national biographical dictionaries.
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    PGAV Factsheet: Integrating climate change into disaster preparedness planning
    Sloggett, R ; Scott, M ; Stewart, H (University of Melbourne, 2021)
    This Fact Sheet will assist galleries to plan for and respond to the impacts of climate change. It provides a 5 step approach to prepare for the increased likelihood of disasters that have not previously posed a serious threat, and a useful table to assist galleries to mitigate the impacts of climate change on their operations and collections.
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    Eliciting group judgements about replicability: A technical implementation of the IDEA Protocol
    Pearson, ER ; Fraser, H ; Bush, M ; Mody, F ; Widjaja, I ; Head, A ; Wilkinson, DP ; Wintle, B ; Sinnott, R ; Vesk, P ; Burgman, M ; Fidler, F (Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, 2021-01-01)
    In recent years there has been increased interest in replicating prior research. One of the biggest challenges to assessing replicability is the cost in resources and time that it takes to repeat studies. Thus there is an impetus to develop rapid elicitation protocols that can, in a practical manner, estimate the likelihood that research findings will successfully replicate. We employ a novel implementation of the IDEA ('Investigate', 'Discuss', 'Estimate' and 'Aggregate) protocol, realised through the repliCATS platform. The repliCATS platform is designed to scalably elicit expert opinion about replicability of social and behavioural science research. The IDEA protocol provides a structured methodology for eliciting judgements and reasoning from groups. This paper describes the repliCATS platform as a multi-user cloud-based software platform featuring (1) a technical implementation of the IDEA protocol for eliciting expert opinion on research replicability, (2) capture of consent and demographic data, (3) on-line training on replication concepts, and (4) exporting of completed judgements. The platform has, to date, evaluated 3432 social and behavioural science research claims from 637 participants.
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    The Ethics of Multiplayer Game Design and Community Management
    A. Sparrow, L ; Gibbs, M ; Arnold, M (ACM, 2021-05)
    Game industry professionals are frequently implementing new methods of addressing ethical issues related to in-game toxicity and disruptive player behaviours associated with online multiplayer games. However, academic work on these behaviours tends to focus on the perspectives of players rather than the industry. To fully understand the ethics of multiplayer games and promote ethical design, we must examine the challenges facing those designing multiplayer games through an ethical lens. To this end, this paper presents a reflexive thematic analysis of 21 in-depth interviews with games industry professionals on their ethical views and experiences in game design and community management. We identify a number of tensions involved in making ethics-related design decisions for divided player communities alongside current game design practices that are concerned with functionality, revenue and entertainment. We then put forward a set of design considerations for integrating ethics into multiplayer game design.
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    Authenticity, Instagram and the artist archive: Contemporary approaches to building a secure artist record in Indonesia
    Sloggett, R ; Tse, N ; O'Donnel, E ; Bridgland, J (ICOM CC, 2021-05-17)
    The circulation of counterfeit paintings in In- donesia’s art centres remains, as it does across the globe, a sensitive issue that distorts the cul- tural narrative and threatens the intellectual property of artists and their legacy. This paper focuses on contemporary Indonesian artist Heri Dono and the methods which he has adopted to protect his intellectual property in response to counterfeit paintings on the market bearing his signature. In 2015, Dono established a personal archive at his studio in Yogyakarta in which he has documented his artistic production since 1979. In 2017, in parallel with the development of the archive, the Studio Kalahan Instagram account began publishing images of counterfeit paintings in Dono’s signature style. Informed by interviews with Dono and other contem- porary Indonesian artists, this research aims to understand issues surrounding the veracity and legacy of the physical and digital archive and in- tegrated ways of building a secure artist record.
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    Conservation and characterization of arabic papyrus in Egyptian National Library and Archives, Egypt
    Mohamed, A ; Nel, P ; Wahba, W ; Kamel, A ; Sloggett, R (IOP Publishing, 2020-11-10)
    An Ara bic Pa pyrus sheet stored a t the Egyptia n Na tiona l Libra ry a nd Archives wa s previously pla ced on unknown seconda ry support, a nd interlea ved between two gla ss sheets enclosed with a dhesive ta pe. This pa pyrus ha s various deteriora tion issues especia lly in the upper section where there is a la rge embedded sta in ca using the pa pyrus to stick to the secondary support a nd the gla ss sheet. Conserva tion trea tments conducted involved clea n ing, fibre a lignment a nd rehousing, scientific investiga tions including visible light microscopy, Fourier tra nsform infra red spectroscopy with a ttenua ted tota l reflecta nce (FTIR-ATR), a nd Sca nning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (SEM-EDS) were conducted to identify ma teria ls involved. A la ck of informa tion in the historica l records a bout the exca vation a nd previous conserva tion trea tments increa se the importa nce of the resea rch. The a na lysis showed tha t the seconda ry support is gela tine a nd Ara bic text wa s written in ca rbon ink. The gela tine support wa s successfully removed from the pa pyrus a nd the pa pyrus document wa s re - housed.
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    Journal of the Australian Early Medieval Association: The Christianisation of Europe
    Dobosz, J ; von Guttner, D ; Dobosz, J (Australian Early Medieval Association, 2020)
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    Time-Layered Cultural Map of Australia
    Arthur, PL ; CHAMPION, E ; Craig, H ; Gu, N ; Harvey, M ; Haskins, V ; May, A ; Pascoe, B ; Piper, A ; Ryan, L ; Smith, R ; Verhoeven, D ; Reinsone, S ; Skadiņa, I ; Baklāne, A ; Daugavietis, J (CEUR Workshop Proceedings (CEUR-WS.org), 2020)
    This paper reports on an Australian project that is developing an online system to deliver researcher-driven national-scale infrastructure for the humanities, focused on mapping, time series, and data integration. Australian scholars and scholars of Australia worldwide are well served with digital resources and tools to deepen the understanding of Australia and its historical and cultural heritage. There are, however, significant barriers to use. The Time Layered Cultural Map of Australia (TLCMap) will provide an umbrella infrastructure related to time and space, helping to activate and draw together existing high-quality resources. TLCMap expands the use of Australian cultural and historical data for research through sharply defined and powerful discovery mechanisms. See https://tlcmap.newcastle.edu.au/.