School of Historical and Philosophical Studies - Research Publications

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    Encounters with the Divine in Late Prehistoric Eastern Anatolia and Southern Caucasus
    SAGONA, A ; SAGONA, C ; Saglamtimur, H ; Abay, E ; Derin, Z ; Erdem, AU ; Konakcı, E ; Dedeoğlu, F ; Erdalkiran, M ; Baştürk, MB ; Batmaz, A (Arkeoloji ve Sanat, 2009)
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    The City in the Greek Colonial World
    TSETSKHLADZE, G ; Lagopoulos, PH (Archaeopress, 2009)
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    Looking for Mithra in Malta
    SAGONA, C (Peeters, 2009)
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    The Black Sea
    Tsetskhladze, GR ; van Wees, ; Raaflaub, A (Wiley, 2009-04-17)
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    Ancient Turkey
    Sagona, A ; Zimansky, P (Routledge, 2015-01-01)
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    Knossos is Burning: Gender Bending the Minoan Genius
    HITCHCOCK, L ; Kopaka, K (Universite de Liege, 2009)
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    Excavations at Samtavro, 2008-2009: An interim report
    Nikolaishvili, V ; Ogleby, C ; Pilbrow, V ; Giunashvili, G ; Manegaladze, G ; Sagona, A ; Sagona, C (Peeters, 2010)
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    Mycenaean Architecture
    Hitchcock, LA ; Cline, EH (Oxford University Press, 2012-01-12)
    Abstract Mycenaean architecture is characterized by both continuity and innovation, as well as by the adoption and adaptation of neighboring practices. The most obvious feature of mainland architecture is that it is hall centered, dominated by a central rectangular hall or megaron, thereby combining both axiality and simplicity. It forms the core element of the palaces in Mycenae, with additional rooms and courtyards organized around it. Construction techniques varied regionally and chronologically but include a variety of techniques including mud-brick superstructures on a stone socle, drywall masonry, rubble masonry, Cyclopean masonry, and ashlar masonry on a stone socle. Ashlar was typically sand or limestone, although saw-cut, dressed conglomerate blocks were used in special places such as thresholds and the entrances of fortifications and tholos tombs. There was also a sparing use of decorative stone such as gypsum, which might reference Crete, in the palaces and other monumental structures such as tombs.
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    Minoan Architecture
    Hitchcock, LA ; Cline, EH (Oxford University Press, 2012-01-12)
    Abstract Minoan architecture is characterized by both tradition and innovation. Although regionalism was more typical of the tomb architecture of the Early Bronze Age, there are also some regional distinctions among Minoan palatial buildings. These distinctions are frequently overshadowed by the emphasis placed on the organization of the palaces around a central court, resulting in the use of the essentialist term “court-centered building.” Houses were characterized by a radial plan with rooms organized around a squarish hall. A preference for corner doorways and a liberal use of corridors and staircases in the palaces and villas enhanced their complexity. Greater cultural uniformity with mainland Greece at the end of the Bronze Age is indicated by the predominance of rectilinear halls with entry on the short side throughout the Aegean.