School of Historical and Philosophical Studies - Research Publications

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    Art in Limbo: Logistical challenges, cultural differences, and the complications of collections access during the pandemic
    Labrador, AMT ; Fekrsanati, F ; Schimmeroth, G (MARKK Hamburg Museum am Rothenbaum – Kulturen und Künste der Welt, 2023)
    Cultural institutions such as museums claim to take a well-informed and strategic approach to care for valued collections, protecting and preserving the material evidence of cultural heritage in line with the overall institutional goals. Although the principles and values ​​that inform such strategies, vary considerably according to context and they often do not reflect the original cultural context.
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    Ontology and knowing: A framework for conserving a rare musical instrument within and beyond the archive
    Tse, N ; Cook, RH ; Kartomi, M ; Chakim, L ; Brigland, J (International Council of Museums, 2023-09-18)
    Conserving cultures other than one’s own and working from the outside provokes questions of authority and the unknown in materials conservation. This paper focuses on identifying knowledge for cultural materials conservation of world culture objects, specifically a rare Indonesian musical instrument known as a bundengan. The study examines the ambiguous tensions surrounding a rare instrument located in an archive geographically isolated from its source community and how it acts as a social trigger to revive living heritage and performance practices, and to build culturally responsible communities of practice in conservation. An ontological framework to expand the knowledge of objects within and outside the archive is presented. The reiterative ontology draws on four disciplinary domains – archives, ethnomusicology, conservation, and performance – to build upon processual knowledge and networks of care, allowing deep connections with contemporary performance communities to emerge.
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    The Lost World of Unspoken Horrors: Aharon Appelfeld’s Holocaust Universe
    Abramovich, D (Hybrid publishers, 2023-12-04)
    This volume offers a close reading of five novels by Aharon Appelfeld (1982-2018), Israel’s most celebrated Shoah author. Fuelled by a desire to introduce this literary giant to foreign language readers, this illuminating collection of essays is a tribute to a prolific writer who, for more than four decades, won international acclaim for his subtle and enigmatic novels, which shimmer with premonitions of the unimaginable horror to come. Overflowing with lucid insights, this deeply reflective study demonstrates how Appelfeld’s stories, usually set in the years immediately before and after the destruction of European Jewry, transform memory into fiction and encase within their midst unfathomable depths in the search for meaning and healing.
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    The Objectivity of Science
    Sankey, H (University of Tabriz, 2024)
    The idea that science is objective, or able to achieve objectivity, is in large part responsible for the role that science plays within society. But what is objectivity? The idea of objectivity is ambiguous. This paper distinguishes between three basic forms of objectivity. The first form of objectivity is ontological objectivity: the world as it is in itself does not depend upon what we think about it; it is independent of human thought, language, conceptual activity or experience. The second form of objectivity is the objectivity of truth: truth does not depend upon what we believe or justifiably believe; truth depends upon the way reality itself is. The third form of objectivity is epistemic objectivity: this form of objectivity resides in the scientific method which ensures that subjective factors are excluded, and only epistemically relevant factors play a role in scientific inquiry. The paper considers two problems that arise for the notion of epistemic objectivity: the theory-dependence of observation and the variability of the methods of science. It is argued that the use of shared standard procedures ensures the objectivity of observation despite theory-dependence. It is argued that the variability of methods need not lead to an epistemic relativism about science. The paper concludes with the realist suggestion that the best explanation of the success of the sciences is that the methods employed in the sciences are highly reliable truth-conducive tools of inquiry. The objectivity of the methods of the sciences leads to the objective truth about the objective world.
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    Merleau-Ponty, Taylor, and the expressiveness of language
    Inkpin, A (WILEY, 2023-01-01)
    Abstract This article explores how the thought that language is expressive, in the sense of bearing emotional or affective meaning, can be made sense of, with particular attention to two authors for whom this thought plays an important role. It begins by introducing the idea of language being “expressive” and using Charles Taylor's work to consider its potential interest, before showing how the expressiveness of language might be accounted for by a position that seems particularly suited to this task, namely Merleau‐Ponty's view of embodied expression in Phenomenology of Perception. I then set out a significant challenge to that position based on Wittgenstein's “private language argument,” which implies there is no necessary connection between language use and a subject's internal (affective) states, thus contesting Merleau‐Ponty's explanatory emphasis on the body. I therefore propose a revised “complex” view of language's expressiveness that meets this Wittgensteinian challenge by reconceiving the body's role. Finally, I draw out some implications of this revised view, arguing that while language itself cannot be considered expressive, it remains significant that we can experience language as expressive. I also suggest that, although apparently threatened, Taylor's position can not only accommodate, but be better understood with, this revised view.
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    The analytical potential of intensive field survey data: Developments in the collection, analysis and interpretation of surface ceramics within the Pontine Region Project
    de Haas, T ; Tol, G ; Meens, A ; Nazou, M ; van de Put, W (Sidestone Press, 2023)
    This paper provides a succinct overview of developments in field survey practices and artefact collection strategies within the Pontine Region Project (PRP), a long-running landscape archaeological project in central Italy. Drawing on various examples from the PRP database, we specifically aim to evaluate the increasing research intensity and artefact sampling approaches adopted in the project and their analytical contribution: first, to refine the chronological and spatial resolution of rural data and to move beyond simplistic rural site classifications; second, to systematically analyse and interpret off-site distributions; and third, to reconstruct regional systems of production and exchange. Countering critiques of the purportedly myopic character of Mediterranean survey practices, we argue that the intensive investigation of small research areas not only complements more extensive survey approaches, but is crucial to counter biases and refine generalizing trends in such datasets.
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    Japanese War Memory and Transnational Activism for Indonesian Survivors of Enforced Military Prostitution During World War Two
    McGregor, K ; Budianta, M ; Tiwon, S (Palgrave Macmillan, 2023-07-28)
    In this chapter, I analyse activism relating to survivors of the so-called comfort women system, enforced military prostitution, during World War Two. The term ‘comfort women’ is highly problematic and considered offensive by many survivors, yet it continues to be the most commonly used term to describe survivors. The most well-known example of national-based activism from affected countries is the activism of the Korean Council. The second most active national group is probably ASCENT from the Philippines (Medoza, 2003). In recognition, however, of the transnational nature of activism on this issue, scholars have studied cooperation between Japanese and Korean activists and between Japanese and Chinese activists, and the role of the Korean diaspora in activism in the United States and Australia. In these studies, the authors have variously reflected on the bases of these transnational partnerships and the different positions of activists within them in relation to their national affiliations and new potential alliances that transcend the nation.
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    Evaluation of Managing Cancer and Living Meaningfully (CALM) in people with advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with immunotherapies or targeted therapies: protocol for a single-arm, mixed-methods pilot study
    Lynch, FA ; Rodin, G ; Jefford, M ; Duffy, M ; Lai-Kwon, J ; Heynemann, S ; Mileshkin, L ; Briggs, L ; Burke, J ; Leigh, L ; Spelman, T ; Ftanou, M (BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, 2023-07)
    INTRODUCTION: People with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with immunotherapies (IT) or targeted therapies (TT) may have improved outcomes in a subset of people who respond, raising unique psychological concerns requiring specific attention. These include the need for people with prolonged survival to reframe their life plans and tolerate uncertainty related to treatment duration and prognosis. A brief intervention for people with advanced cancer, Managing Cancer and Living Meaningfully (CALM), could help people treated with IT or TT address these concerns. However, CALM has not been specifically evaluated in this population. This study aims to evaluate the acceptability and feasibility of CALM in people with advanced NSCLC treated with IT or TT and obtain preliminary evidence regarding its effectiveness in this population. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Twenty people with advanced NSCLC treated with IT or TT will be recruited from Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia. Participants will complete three to six sessions of CALM delivered over 3-6 months. A prospective, single-arm, mixed-methods pilot study will be conducted. Participants will complete outcome measures at baseline, post-intervention, 3 months and 6 months, including Patient Health Questionnaire, Death and Dying Distress Scale, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy General and Clinician Evaluation Questionnaire. The acceptability of CALM will be assessed using patient experiences surveys and qualitative interviews. Feasibility will be assessed by analysis of recruitment rates, treatment adherence and intervention delivery time. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approval has been granted by the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC/82047/PMCC). Participants with cancer will complete a signed consent form prior to participation, and carers and therapists will complete verbal consent. Results will be made available to funders, broader clinicians and researchers through conference presentations and publications. If CALM is found to be acceptable in this cohort, this will inform a potential phase 3 trial.
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    Albrecht Dürer's Material World
    Wouk, EH ; Spinks, J ; Wouk, EH ; Spinks, J (Manchester University Press, 2023)
    The painter and printmaker Albrecht Dürer is one of the most important figures of the German Renaissance. This book accompanies the first major exhibition of the Whitworth art gallery's outstanding Dürer collection in over half a century. It offers a new perspective on Dürer as an intense observer of the worlds of manufacture, design and trade that fill his graphic art. Artworks and artefacts examined here expose understudied aspects of Dürer's art and practice, including his attentive examination of objects of daily domestic use, his involvement in economies of local manufacture and exchange, the microarchitectures of local craft and, finally, his attention to cultures of natural and philosophical inquiry and learning.
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    The workshop
    Hanß, S ; Spinks, J ; Wouk, EH ; Wouk, EH ; Spinks, J (Manchester University Press, 2023-06-06)
    The painter and printmaker Albrecht Dürer is one of the most important figures of the German Renaissance. This book accompanies the first major exhibition of the Whitworth art gallery's outstanding Dürer collection in over half a century. It offers a new perspective on Dürer as an intense observer of the worlds of manufacture, design and trade that fill his graphic art. Artworks and artefacts examined here expose understudied aspects of Dürer's art and practice, including his attentive examination of objects of daily domestic use, his involvement in economies of local manufacture and exchange, the microarchitectures of local craft and, finally, his attention to cultures of natural and philosophical inquiry and learning.