School of Historical and Philosophical Studies - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 816
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Irish Women and Men in Victoria's Prisons, 1850s-1880s
    Malcolm, E (Irish Studies Association of Australia and New Zealand, 2019)
    Claims that the Catholic Irish-born community in colonial Australia was characterised by high rates of criminal offending were accepted by many contemporaries and have been widely repeated by historians since. Poverty, drunkenness, alienation and prejudice have all been put forward as explanations for lawbreaking. This article, through an analysis of samples of Irish prisoners in late nineteenth-century Victoria, challenges assessments of the levels and nature of Irish crime and the reasons offered for them. It shows that a large proportion of offenders were middle-aged women, not young men as is frequently assumed, and that most were convicted of non-violent, victimless public order offences that even at the time were acknowledged to be hardly crimes in any meaningful sense.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    The Adaptation of Tertiary Admissions Practices to Growth and Diversity
    Harvey, A ; BRETT, M ; Cardak, B ; Sheridan, A ; Stratford, J ; Tootell, N ; Mcallister, R (La Trobe University, 2016)
    The expansion of higher education places adaptive pressure on institutional and policy frameworks that were originally designed at times of lower levels of participation. This adaptive pressure is evident in changes to admission and selection practices, and has become more acute with the introduction of demand driven funding for undergraduate Commonwealth supported places. Universities seeking to optimise their market share in line with their values and strategic objectives are increasingly utilising direct admissions rather than historically dominant state centralised admissions processes. Direct entry pathways are also being utilised by some institutions as a means of increasing their share of disadvantaged students in particular. Both centralised and direct admissions pathways are also drawing on contextual data – such as the geo-demographic background of the applicant, school attended, perceived academic potential, or volunteer and community service – in the assessment process (Harvey 2014). The growth and complexity of university admissions practices raises two key questions. First, what impact is rising complexity in admissions practices having on student decision-making, with particular emphasis on students from disadvantaged backgrounds? And, second, how are universities and state-based tertiary admissions centres (TACs) responding to the challenges associated with rising student participation, diversity and mobility, as well as complexity in admissions practice?
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Introduction: War and Memory in Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus
    Fedor, J ; Lewis, S ; Zhurzhenko, T ; Fedor, J ; Kangaspuro, M ; Lassila, J ; Zhurzhenko, T (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017-01-01)
    This introductory essay begins with a discussion of World War II memory in Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus, in light of the recent and ongoing war in Ukraine. It outlines the main contours of the interplay between “memory wars” and real war, and the important “post-Crimean” qualitative shift in local memory cultures in this connection. Next, the essay sketches out the specifics of the war memory landscapes of the region, and then of each of the three individual countries, before moving on to introduce the key organizing themes and findings of the book.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Memory, Kinship, and the Mobilization of the Dead: The Russian State and the “Immortal Regiment” Movement
    Fedor, J ; Fedor, J ; Kangaspuro, M ; Lassila, L ; Zhurzhenko, T (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017-01-01)
    This chapter examines a new addition to the repertoire of Victory Day commemorative traditions in post-Soviet space: the newly invented annual “Immortal Regiment” parade, in which people march bearing photographs of their ancestors who fought in the Great Patriotic War of 1941–1945. The chapter focuses on attempts by the state authorities and their supporters to instrumentalize the new ritual and to appropriate the Red Army’s war dead, and the emotions they evoke. It explores the ways in which the figure of the dead Red Army soldier is being brought back to life in new ways as part of the current regime’s authoritarian project.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Editorial
    Tse, N ; Rajkowski, R (Informa UK Limited, 2015-06-01)
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    The AICCM Bulletin, Volume 37.1 Editorial
    Tse, N (Informa UK Limited, 2016-01-02)
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Editorial
    Tse, N (Informa UK Limited, 2017-01-02)
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    APTCCARN: Working towards a network of shared material conservation actions
    Tse, N (International Institute for Asian Studies, 2018)
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Decision making, materiality and digitisation: Esteban Villanueva’s 'Basi Revolt Paintings of Ilocos'
    Tse, N ; Soriano, M ; Labrador, AM ; Balarbar, RA (Routledge - Taylor & Francis, 2018)
    Esteban Villanueva’s fourteen 1821 paintings, the Basi Revolt Paintings of Ilocos, are valued for their representation of the conflict between the Spanish colonial administration and Filipino Ilocano insurgents. As pictorial documents representing the emergence of secular artistic practice in the Philippines, they possess significant social and historical narratives of national independence and the Ilocano’s strength of character. Damage, previous restorations and the effects of tropical climates have not been kind to the Basi Revolt paintings and their visual reading is complex. This paper reports on the technical and materials analysis of the paintings, documentation, digitisation and image analysis as a conservation model to broaden perspectives on knowledge acquisition in conservation. Conservation decision making in the Philippines is an additional focus of the paper, with an examination of localised values, and the trajectory and life of the paintings to inform conservation actions and creative processes.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Materiality, Making and Meaning: Building the Artist Record through Conservation in Indonesia
    O’Donnell, E ; Tse, N (Institut Seni Indonesia Yogyakarta, 2018)
    Ways of knowing and understanding the artistic process are not fixed, and there are multiple perceptions that rely on the experience of the viewer and sources that inform them. this paper presents a case study of a conservation residency and collaborative treatment of indonesian artist Entang wiharso’s ‘landscaping My Brain’ (2001) oil on canvas triptych painting, to examine how we understand the artistic process from a conservation perspective and how this material knowledge contributes to the artist record. an interdisciplinary methodology for the conservation treatment of wiharso’s painting relied on technical and visual examination of the artwork in partnership with artist interviews and archival research. the residency concluded with an exhibition of the painting in an ‘active state of conservation’, highlighting the conservation decisionmaking process as value based and culturally grounded, leading to questions of authority, the role of technical-conservation expertise, what approaches work best, who should do the work and what knowledge informs it. in considering how we understand the artistic process, this paper will draw on the importance of practice-based interdisciplinary learning between conservator, artist, collector, curator and students, and the potential for collaboration and knowledge building at the intersection of these disciplines.