School of Historical and Philosophical Studies - Research Publications

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    ‘Death by Twitter’: Understanding false death announcements on social media and the performance of platform cultural capital
    Nansen, B ; O'Donnell, D ; Arnold, M ; Kohn, T ; Gibbs, M (University of Illinois Libraries, 2019)
    In this paper, we analyse false death announcements of public figures on social media and public responses to them. The analysis draws from a range of public sources to collect and categorise the volume of false death announcements on Twitter and undertakes a case study analysis of representative examples. We classify false death announcements according to five overarching types: accidental; misreported; misunderstood; hacked; and hoaxed. We identify patterns of user responses, which cycle through the sharing of the news, to personal grief, to a sense of uncertainty or disbelief. But we also identify more critical and cultural responses to such death announcements in relation to misinformation and the quality of digital news, or cultures of hoax and disinformation on social media. Here we see the performance of online identity through a form that we describe, following Bourdieu as ‘platform cultural capital’.
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    Knowing what would happen: The epistemic strategies in Galileo's thought experiments
    Camilleri, K (ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2015-12-01)
    While philosophers have subjected Galileo's classic thought experiments to critical analysis, they have tended to largely ignored the historical and intellectual context in which they were deployed, and the specific role they played in Galileo's overall vision of science. In this paper I investigate Galileo's use of thought experiments, by focusing on the epistemic and rhetorical strategies that he employed in attempting to answer the question of how one can know what would happen in an imaginary scenario. Here I argue we can find three different answers to this question in Galileo later dialogues, which reflect the changing meanings of 'experience' and 'knowledge' (scientia) in the early modern period. Once we recognise that Galileo's thought experiments sometimes drew on the power of memory and the explicit appeal to 'common experience', while at other times, they took the form of demonstrative arguments intended to have the status of necessary truths; and on still other occasions, they were extrapolations, or probable guesses, drawn from a carefully planned series of controlled experiments, it becomes evident that no single account of the epistemological relationship between thought experiment, experience and experiment can adequately capture the epistemic variety we find Galileo's use of imaginary scenarios. To this extent, we cannot neatly classify Galileo's use of thought experiments as either 'medieval' or 'early modern', but we should see them as indicative of the complex epistemological transformations of the early seventeenth century.
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    Why do we find Bohr obscure? Reading Bohr as a philosopher of experiment
    Camilleri, K ; Faye, J ; Folse, H (Bloomsbury Academic, 2017)
    Niels Bohr's philosophical view of quantum mechanics has been the subject of extensive scholarship for the better part of five decades. Yet Bohr’s writings have remained obscure, as evidenced by the variety of different scholarly interpretations of his work. In this chapter, I review the historiography of Bohr scholarship, arguing that his meaning has remained elusive because his central preoccupations lay not so much with an interpretation of the quantum-mechanical formalism, which many commentators see as the problem of quantum theory, but rather with the epistemological question of how we can acquire empirical knowledge of quantum objects by means of experiment. Bohr’s doctrine of classical concepts, I argue, is therefore best understood as a philosophy of experiment.
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    Bohr and the problem of the quantum-to-classical transition
    Schlosshauer, M ; Camilleri, K ; Faye, J ; Folse, H (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2017-10-19)
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    Lost Visual Histories: China’s Tang dynasty (618-906) tomb mural paintings
    Eckfeld, T (International Institute for Asian Studies (IIAS), 2018)
    China’s Tang dynasty (618-907) tomb mural paintings are rare finds and study of them has grown since the first archaeological discoveries and excavations in the early 1950s. Although thousands of minor Tang graves and about 400 tombs have been discovered, so far only around 60 Tang tombs have been found to contain mural paintings. While many questions are still to be answered, each new discovery contributes to knowledge in this important field.
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    A Polite Way to say ‘No’
    Sloggett, R ; Lawler-Dormer, K ( 2018-10-24)
    Presentation to NZCCM 2018 Conference Living Heritage: Materials, Methods and Context: As is the case in most countries, much of Australia’s cultural record is not housed in large national institutions but in smaller organisations, often located in remote, regional or rural areas and with limited resources, and run by fe staff, or by volunteers. Most have limited access to conservation expertise. These organisations rely on accessible and practical advice in publications such as reCollections: Caring for Collections Across Australia (1998). Created as an initiative of the Heritage Collections Council in 1998 and supported by the Australian Federal Government reCollections has become an essential resource providing preventative conservation principles for Australian cultural organisations. The current program to update and create reCollections Online offers the opportunity to engage current users and the wider community in contributing to a more tailored preventative conservation resource. A partnership between Bathurst Regional Council, NSW Australia, and the Grimwade Centre at the University of Melbourne brings together conservators and conservation students with Bathurst museum and heritage professionals and volunteers. A recent study, which interviewed heritage professionals in Bathurst and sought their involvement in the revision of reCollections, revealed a content gap in the Acquisitions and Significance section of reCollections. This revision identified the need for practical advice to inform decision making at the initial point of acquisitions through to storage and display. The study also identified the need for professionals and volunteers to understand and assess personnel implications that might arise during or after the acquisition process.
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    Considering Evidence in Art Fraud
    SLOGGETT, R ; Chappell, D ; Hufnagel, S (Routledge - Taylor & Francis, 2016)
    Securing the evidential link between the work and the artist who is purported to have produced it requires a rigorous analytical approach; one that not only accepts particular evidence that may support the assertion of authenticity, but which can also contest evidence that is not correct. Such an approach is by its very nature multidisciplinary, often bringing together knowledge of art history, the art market, cultural materials conservation, chemistry, law and policing. What constitutes evidence of authenticity is generally based on considerations of provenance, art historical context, including facts about the artist and scientific enquiry. Building the chain of evidence for art authentication is a complex and carefully constructed activity that ensures that works can be legitimately, and verifiably, linked to the artist who is purported to be their source.
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    A Conservation Overview of Gaps in Traditional Trade Skills in Australia
    Dunn, B ; Sloggett, R ; Draayers, W (Informa UK Limited, 2019-07-03)
    In 2003, the General Conference of UNESCO adopted the Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage; recognising the important role traditional craftmanship has as a tangible manifestation of intangible heritage and highlighting the importance of the intergenerational transmission of knowledge and skills. Within this context, a Conservation Skills Gaps survey was conducted in 2016 that examined whether there was a current perceived skills gap relating to traditional trades; what difficulties might conservators have in accessing these trades; and, how such a skills gap might be addressed? This paper examines the results of this survey, reviews the 2000 AICCM Skills Gap Audit and the 2018 Heritage Skills Initiative Sector Analysis Survey that reported on the health of traditional trade skills in Australia, and discusses recent initiatives to revitalise rare trades. It also examines current work in developing opportunities to build intergenerational knowledge transfer, support specialist practitioners, and generate solutions to address skill gaps in traditional trades and conservation.
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