School of Historical and Philosophical Studies - Research Publications

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    Considering Evidence in Art Fraud
    SLOGGETT, R ; Chappell, D ; Hufnagel, S (Routledge - Taylor & Francis, 2016)
    Securing the evidential link between the work and the artist who is purported to have produced it requires a rigorous analytical approach; one that not only accepts particular evidence that may support the assertion of authenticity, but which can also contest evidence that is not correct. Such an approach is by its very nature multidisciplinary, often bringing together knowledge of art history, the art market, cultural materials conservation, chemistry, law and policing. What constitutes evidence of authenticity is generally based on considerations of provenance, art historical context, including facts about the artist and scientific enquiry. Building the chain of evidence for art authentication is a complex and carefully constructed activity that ensures that works can be legitimately, and verifiably, linked to the artist who is purported to be their source.
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    The Triple Helix of Tang Dynasty Mural Painting Study: Art History, Archaeology and Materials Conservation
    Eckfeld, T ; Zhou, T (The Commercial Press (HK), 2017)
    Deep understanding of Tang Dynasty tomb mural painting can only be achieved through multi-disciplinary study using a ‘triple helix’ approach combining archaeology, materials conservation and art history. Cooperation between these three professions and their particular disciplinary perspectives can provide comprehensive insight into the mural paintings and reflect their original state as the combined product of patrons, artists, architects and engineers. This paper discusses how a triple helix approach may answer some of the more challenging questions about the murals, including the identity of the painters, workshop practices, methods of production and painting techniques, and shed light on the lost corpus of above ground Tang Dynasty mural paintings.
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    The Qin and Han Empires: Creating a Dynasty
    Eckfeld, T ; No, (Council of Trustees of the National Gallery of Victoria, 2019-08)
    Terracotta Warriors: Guardians of Immortality showcases these extraordinary Qin dynasty objects, along with priceless gold, jade and bronze artefacts dating from the Zhou dynasty through to the Han dynasty.With written contributions from ...
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    The last avant garde?
    Austin, S ; Duncan, K ; Goggin, G ; MacDowall, L ; Pardo, V ; Paterson, E ; Brown, JJ ; Collett, M ; Cook, F ; Hadley, B ; Hood, K ; Kapuscinski-Evans, J ; McDonald, D ; McNamara, J ; Mellis, G ; Sifis, E ; Sulan, K ; Hadley, B ; McDonald, D (Routledge, 2019)
    This chapter explores 'disability aesthetics' not as a set of specific techniques, themes, or politics, but in order to position disability at the centre of 'future conceptions of what art is' and what it can be. It draws contributions from the Research in Action workshop and the research team to explore the idea of the last avant garde and artists' views on how disability intersects with creative innovation. The chapter seeks to engage in a reflexive and ongoing conversation in which artists with disability are invited to reflect upon their own views on aesthetic value and performance practice. It also implies that recognition of disability arts is like the 'last remaining' piece of a puzzle, the pinnacle of a longer social struggle for rights and acceptance. For a company composed of artists with and without disability, of which Rawcus is but one prominent Australian example, the notion of disability aesthetics and the last avant garde is particularly complicated.
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    Unmasking Art Forgery: Scientific Approaches
    Sloggett, R ; Hufnagel, S ; Chappell, D (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019)
    Scientific approaches to art forgery provide the rigorous methodology by which claims made about a work can be tested. A plethora of scientific instrumentation is available for the analysis of artwork but data are only useful when assessed against existing secure points of identification. Verifiability of results, therefore, relies on standardised documentation, defined rules of evidence and ensuring that all processes and findings are reproducible. In building knowledge of what characteristics constitute authentic works, providing effective protocols and rigorous procedures and bringing together multi-disciplinary knowledge to bear on questions of art forgery, science has become an essential part of good curatorial practice, effective conservation procedure and art market diligence.
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    The Practical Tradition of Dutch Newtonianism
    Wiesenfeldt, G ; Boran, EA ; Feingold, M (Brill, 2017-06-15)
    Dutch natural philosophers played a crucial role in interpreting and disseminating Isaac Newton's ideas throughout Europe. The chapter discusses how their views of Newton related to older Dutch traditions, most notably the so-called Dutch Mathematics - practical mathematics taught at universities in the vernacular for aspiring surveyors and military engineers. Within this field, a new understanding of natural philosophy had emerged, into which Newtonian science could be easily integrated.
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    The ‘Duytsche Mathematique’ and Leiden Family Networks, 1600–1620
    Wiesenfeldt, G ; Dijksterhuis, FJ ; Weber, A ; Zuidervaart, H (Brill, 2019)
    This interdisciplinary volume uses four hundred years of Dutch history as a laboratory to investigate spatialized understandings of the history of knowledge.
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    Conservation in Australian museums
    Cook, ; Lyall, ; Pearson, ; Sloggett, RJ ; Griffin, ; Paroissien, (National Museum of Australia, 2011)
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    Psychotherapy
    Buchanan, R ; Haslam, N ; Sternberg, RJ ; Pickren, W (Cambridge University Press, 2019-06-30)
    We cannot understand contemporary psychology without first researching its history. Unlike other books on the history of psychology, which are chronologically ordered, this Handbook is organized topically.
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    The Self Possessed: Framing Identity in Late Minoan Glyptic
    Tully, C ; CROOKS, S ; Borgna, E ; Caloi, I ; Carinci, F ; Laffineur, R (Peeters-Leuven, 2019-05-01)
    A group of Late Minoan signet rings fashioned in precious metals and engraved with complex and evocative iconographic schemes appears to depict ‘nature’ or ‘rural’ cults enacted at extra-urban sanctuaries, and may have functioned as inalienable possessions implicated in the expression and maintenance of elite identities during the Aegean Bronze Age. The images on the ring bezels depict human figures in association with epiphanic figures situated in settings characterised by the presence of trees and stones, columnar shrines, stepped altars, openwork platforms, tripartite shrines and sanctuary walls, perhaps involving occasional rites and the erection and dismantling of temporary cult structures which can themselves be viewed as architectonic replications of rural cult sites and natural forms. Just as the fabric of these rings and the artistry and technical skill of their production were of restricted accessibility and controlled distribution, we may infer that so, too, the rites, places and activities recorded on these rings were socially restricted. Possession of these distinctive and desirable objects of economic, cultural and symbolic value may have signified access to, involvement in and mastery over such rituals, the special status of the owner delineated and broadcast through the circulating media of clay sealings, advertising their special relationship with forces and places within nature. Over time the personal and cultural memory, knowledge and associations accumulated within these rings may form histories or biographies of the rings themselves, implicating the identities of their past and present owners, and of the wider community. In this way, they can be understood as inalienable possessions, objects invested with authority and authenticity that in turn authenticate the status of their owners. These enduring symbols draw the past into the present, instantiating cultural and cosmological ideals which classify and objectify social relations through referencing the past. Thus these rings function as mnemonic devices, palimpsests of memory, association and affect which store and transmit information about spatially and temporally disbursed places, people and events, memorialising and broadcasting elite association with the (super)natural world and forming part of the material affordances of the world of things which recursively produce, reiterate and transform identities through ecologies of practice: the past mediated in the present through memory materialised in objects.