School of Historical and Philosophical Studies - Research Publications

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    Developing Museum to Museum Cultural Engagement Between Australia and Timor Leste
    Assis, C ; SLOGGETT, R ; Leach, M ; Canas Mendes, N ; da Silva, A ; Boughton, B ; Ximenes, A (Swinburne Press, 2022-01-12)
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    Integrating Climate Change Impacts into Disaster Preparedness and Response
    Sloggett, R ; Scott, M ; Stubbs, C ; Nolan, S ( 2021-11-26)
    Presentation to Public Galleries of Victoria on climate change responses for galleries
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    Challenging Authenticity: knowledge framed by evidence
    Sloggett, R ( 2021-05-29)
    ArtCrime2021: The Symposium: Preventing Art Crime
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    Foreword
    Sloggett, R (Student Conservators at Melbourne, 2021-12-17)
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    Two-Way Learning: Sharing Conservation Education at the Warmun Art Centre and the Grimwade Centre
    Nodea, G ; Sloggett, R (Getty Conservation Institute, 2021-09-08)
    This invited paper details the partnership between the Warmun Art Centre and the Grimwade Centre and examines its value as a model for conservation programs world-wide. For the Gija people of the Kimberley region in northwestern Australia, Ngarranggarni is the belief and knowledge system that guides the Gija way of life. Gija ancestors established Ngarranggarni when they created the land, law, plants, animals, and people. Ngarranggarni guides contemporary Gija life, governing family and clan relationships and Gija people’s connection to, and responsibility for, their clan country. It defines who Gija people are and sets out clear rules for how to behave properly as a member of Gija society. Gija Elders, respectfully referred to as The Old People, are responsible for keeping Ngarranggarni strong, and for teaching younger generations. This knowledge cannot be passed on without the permission of The Old People. This paper explores the education relationship that has been developed between the Gija community at Warmun and the Grimwade Centre for Cultural Materials Conservation in order to build mutually beneficial teaching and research programs. The concept of two-way learning was devised in Warmun in the late 1970s and forms the basis for the partnership between the Warmun Art Centre and the Grimwade Centre.
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    Culture and climate change: the value of local collections in addressing climate change
    Sloggett, R (Ministry of Culture, Community and Youth, Singapore, 2021)
    Using case studies from Australia, the author highlights how collecting institutions and local historical societies have an important role to play in responding to the challenges of climate change, from discharging their responsibilities of care for collections and providing critical data on how communities have historically responded to natural disasters, to supporting effective community rebuilding after crises and sustaining a sense of culture and identity.
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    PGAV Factsheet: Integrating climate change into disaster preparedness planning
    Sloggett, R ; Scott, M ; Stewart, H (University of Melbourne, 2021)
    This Fact Sheet will assist galleries to plan for and respond to the impacts of climate change. It provides a 5 step approach to prepare for the increased likelihood of disasters that have not previously posed a serious threat, and a useful table to assist galleries to mitigate the impacts of climate change on their operations and collections.
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    CONSERVATION AS SHARED RESPONSIBILITY: SOCIAL EQUITY, SOCIAL JUSTICE, AND THE PUBLIC GOOD
    Meredith, A ; Sloggett, RAM ; Scott, M (UNIV PENNSYLVANIA PRESS, 2021-03-01)
    Social inequity presents a risk to cultural heritage, but conservation also contributes to social equity and justice goals. With a focus on groups in Australia whose access to conservation, and thus to their rights to their heritage, is disrupted by social inequities, this paper argues that conservation, as a normative discipline premised on the idea of a future in which heritage is accessible and open to interpretation, use and enjoyment, must, like social equity and justice movements, work to create more equitable socio-political futures. Theorizing that conservation is a public good, and focused through case studies that examine Aboriginal Art Centres, conservation education and regional and remote cultural collections, a case is established for the need to rebalance conservation in areas which have experienced past structural injustice. Utilizing the ethical and political philosophy of Iris Marion Young and Christine Sypnowich, critical evaluations of the profession that attempt to redefine conservation discourses are proposed to demonstrate the obligation of conservation to account for principles of social equity and justice. Overall, the paper reflects on the philosophical, ethical and societal implications for the profession of understanding conservation as a process characterized by change.
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    Authenticity, Instagram and the artist archive: Contemporary approaches to building a secure artist record in Indonesia
    Sloggett, R ; Tse, N ; O'Donnel, E ; Bridgland, J (ICOM CC, 2021-05-17)
    The circulation of counterfeit paintings in In- donesia’s art centres remains, as it does across the globe, a sensitive issue that distorts the cul- tural narrative and threatens the intellectual property of artists and their legacy. This paper focuses on contemporary Indonesian artist Heri Dono and the methods which he has adopted to protect his intellectual property in response to counterfeit paintings on the market bearing his signature. In 2015, Dono established a personal archive at his studio in Yogyakarta in which he has documented his artistic production since 1979. In 2017, in parallel with the development of the archive, the Studio Kalahan Instagram account began publishing images of counterfeit paintings in Dono’s signature style. Informed by interviews with Dono and other contem- porary Indonesian artists, this research aims to understand issues surrounding the veracity and legacy of the physical and digital archive and in- tegrated ways of building a secure artist record.
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    Across place and across time: ‘reading’ the Middle Eastern Manuscript Collection in the University of Melbourne.
    Sloggett, R (TAASA, 2020-11-26)
    The University of Melbourne Middle Eastern Manuscript Collection in the University of Melbourne Library consists of nearly 200 manuscripts. Written in Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Urdu, Ethiopic, Syriac, Hebrew, Sanskirt, Pushtu, Prakit and Mongol scripts, the collection includes Qur'ans, commentary on the Qur'an, poetry, biographies, works on history, astrology, mathematics, philosophy, weaponry, and even a wedding certificate. The core of the collection was formed from 1959 to 1975 by the energetic Chair of Semitic Studies at the University of Melbourne Professor John Bowman, who amassed the collection as a teaching resource in the Department of Middle Eastern Studies. Following Professor Bowman’s retirement, the collection was relocated to the University of Melbourne Library where today it is the focus of rich interdisciplinary research that brings together conservators, physicists, and PhD candidates at the University of Melbourne with manuscript scholars from across the globe to examine scripts, texts, pigments, bindings, watermarks and provenance of works in the collection. This paper explores some of the gems in the collection and the related research that is producing new knowledge about materials and techniques of used in the production of Middle Eastern manuscripts.