Faculty of Education - Research Publications

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    Where powerful knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge intersect: the case of knowledge and beliefs for teaching school geography through inquiry
    Lee, SJ ; Kriewaldt, J (Taylor and Francis Group, 2024)
    Despite global interest in inquiry as a teaching and learning approach for school geography, little is known about teachers’ knowledge and beliefs for teaching geography through inquiry. This paper reports on findings from a survey of 44 Victorian secondary teachers’ knowledge, beliefs and practice of teaching geography through inquiry. Our findings reveal that geography teachers believe in the power of geographical knowledge to influence young people’s attitudes, values, emotions and ethical action and the power of incorporating geography inquiry to deliver these ambitious educational goals. This paper concludes that knowledge for teaching geography through inquiry is a dynamic collection of rich and situated knowledge constructed in and with practice, and teachers’ beliefs are deeply intertwined. These conclusions augment Shulman’s concept of pedagogical content knowledge by incorporating concepts of powerful knowledge and curriculum-making, signalling a way forward on knowledge for teaching powerful subject knowledge through inquiry. We argue that geography inquiry is key to experiencing and developing powerful knowledge in geography. Disciplinary inquiry supports, even gives flesh to, Young’s vision of a Future 3 curriculum.
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    A Student-Centric Evaluation of a Program Addressing Prevention of Gender-Based Violence in Three African Countries
    Cahill, H ; Dadvand, B ; Suryani, A ; Farrelly, A (MDPI AG, 2023-08-01)
    Studies investigating the effectiveness of school-related gender-based violence prevention programs seldom report on the extent to which students themselves value and recommend such programs. Yet, along with evidence about effectiveness in relation to shifts in knowledge, attitudes, or intentions, student-valuing is a significant indicator that the programs can make a positive contribution to students' lives. This mixed-method study analyses survey and focus group data collected from ninety-two schools in three African countries (Tanzania, Zambia, and Eswatini). Students found the program contributed to improved peer relationships and identified the five most useful components as learning about gender equality and human rights, learning how to obtain help for those affected by violence, understanding and communicating about their emotions, strategies to avoid joining in with bullying and harassment, and understanding the effects of gender-based violence.
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    Support for Dyscalculia
    Sze, J (Mathematical Association of Victoria, 2024-04)
    In January 2022 after months of research on finding an appropriate professional body to learn more about dyscalculia. I could not find any organisations that offer a practical course with evidence-based research on how to teach students with maths learning difficulties in Australia. Through prior Professional Learning at SPELD Victoria, I encountered Dyscalculia Association UK and started the year long online course. The course is an interactive hands-on course designed by Professor Steve Chinn and Judy Hornigold of the Dyscalculia Association UK. The following reflection is the Final Practicum I submitted after successfully completing 10 hours of teaching maths to a group of learning difficulties students in year 6. In this article, I have outlined critical evaluation and reflection on the lessons. I have included a structure of a multisensory maths lesson plan based on the Singapore Maths pedagogy (Chinn, 2017; Hornigold, 2017). I then tailored the lessons to the students’ learning needs and teach them accordingly.
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    Inclusive gaming through AI: a perspective for identifying opportunities and obstacles through co-design with people living with MND
    Dwyer, N ; Harrison, M ; O'Mara, B ; Harley, K (Frontiers Media S.A., 2024-04-10)
    This interdisciplinary research initiative seeks to enhance the accessibility of video gaming for individuals living with Motor Neurone Disease (MND), a condition characterized by progressive muscle weakness. Gaming serves as a social and recreational outlet for many, connecting friends, family, and even strangers through collaboration and competition. However, MND’s disease progression, including muscle weakness and paralysis, severely limit the ability to engage in gaming. In this paper, we desscribe our exploration of AI solutions to improve accessibility to gaming. We argue that any application of accessible AI must be led by lived experience. Notably, we found in our previous scoping review, existing academic research into video games for those living with MND largely neglects the experiences of MND patients in the context of video games and AI, which was a prompt for us to address this critical gap.
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    Growing up in Victoria, Australia, in the midst of the climate emergency
    Chavez, KM ; Quinn, P ; Gibbs, L ; Block, K ; Leppold, C ; Stanley, J ; Vella-Brodrick, D (SAGE Publications, 2024-03)
    Children and young people (henceforth referred to as young people) are one of the groups most affected by climate change and are at the forefront of climate action. Yet, there is scarce evidence on how young people navigate the challenges presented by climate change using their personal strengths and the resources accessible to them. This study aimed to address this gap by drawing on qualitative data from workshops with 31 young people between 12 and 22 years of age from metropolitan Melbourne and a bushfire-risk region in Victoria, Australia. An inductive thematic analysis of workshop transcripts showed that participants had progressively become aware of climate change in an increasingly uncertain world and sought to gain a sense of connection, agency, and hope. Participants aimed to achieve the latter by becoming aware of opportunities for climate actions in everyday life and developing themselves as agents of change. We discussed our findings from a developmental perspective to gain a better understanding of how supporting young people in learning about and acting on climate change can benefit their mental health and sense of agency.
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    Conceptualising multilingualism in higher education in Timor-Leste: the case of petroleum studies
    Newman, T (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2022-05-19)
    In this paper I present a critical discussion of the ways that multilingualism is conceptualised in the context of higher education in Timor-Leste, a small, developing nation in South-East Asia. Drawing on a range of ethnographic data collected at multiple Timorese tertiary institutions from 2015 to 2018, I focus especially on the language-related beliefs and practices of a small group of petroleum studies lecturers, who are at the meeting point of diverse ideological forces that impact their teaching. I discuss their conceptualisations of both the ‘language problem’ facing them, and their own hybrid classroom communication practices, examining how these conceptualisations are shaped by wider political discourses favouring Portuguese, Indonesian and English. I argue that these discourses not only complicate due recognition of the considerable resourcefulness these lecturers display in communicating disciplinary knowledge to students, but also weigh heavily on their own perceptions of their everyday work as tertiary educators.
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    Tetun akademiku: University lecturers' roles in the intellectualisation of Tetum
    Newman, T (Springer, 2021-02)
    In this article I examine lecturers’ beliefs about the use of Tetum for academic, scientific and vocational communication at university in Timor-Leste and discuss the discursive and performative language planning roles that they play in the intellectualisation of the language. Drawing on analysis of recorded discussions among university lecturers from different disciplinary areas and distinct institutional settings, I identify a range of discursive and ideological forces being brought to bear on the use of Tetum to communicate disciplinary and professional knowledge. I focus especially on lecturers’ value-laden explanations for how and why they ‘mix’ Tetum with Portuguese, English and Indonesian in particular contexts of classroom communication. Lecturers’ statements about the limitations of Tetum for academic and scientific communication, while grounded in the real need for coordinated intellectualisation of the language, also mask lecturers’ individual preferences for (and greater confidence in) the use of more established ‘academic languages’, stemming from their own past experiences of language socialisation. I argue that these negative beliefs about the potential reach of Tetum reinforce hegemonic discourses that work against its coordinated intellectualisation. Meanwhile, significant individual efforts towards the intellectualisation of Tetum endure in the form of innovative translation and translanguaging work; efforts that I argue require greater attention and support. I conclude with a discussion about the need to recognise and value the expertise and contributions of multiple stakeholders in the development and intellectualisation of the Tetum language, including those who are not traditionally understood as ‘language experts’.
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    Mindfulness in education: Critical debates and pragmatic considerations
    Lee, W ; McCaw, CT ; Van Dam, NT (Wiley, 2024)
    Mindfulness has all but become a mainstay in modern education. Yet despite the incredible enthusiasm and increased application in schools, there remains significant divergence between advocates and critics. Advocates assert that mindfulness practice promotes individual and societal health and well-being. Meanwhile, critics question the intention and the social and political implications of promoting these ancient practices in schools, arguing that the Buddhist ethics underlying mindfulness remain incompatible with the neoliberal ideology and instrumentalism of contemporary schooling. As mindfulness has been commodified, instrumentalised and used as a therapeutic tool for acute coping, its broader potential for human growth and development may be undermined. Furthermore, scholars caution that the fledging nature of mindfulness research leaves critical questions unanswered, especially the potential for adverse effects. The work herein examines these critiques, presenting three critical considerations for mindfulness in education, and articulates practical recommendations for educational leaders, policy makers and stakeholders. We aim to empower educators and others to make judgements about the promotion and integration of mindfulness into educational settings, considering context-specific factors such as developmental needs and capacities, as well as recommendations to support effective and ethical practice of mindfulness in education.
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    From apology to truth? Settler colonial injustice and curricular reform in Australia since 2008
    Keynes, M (Taylor and Francis Group, 2024)
    This article explores how recent curricular reform in Australia has been responsive to a culture of redress. It argues that taken together, the 2008 National Apology to the Stolen Generations and the 2010 national curriculum reform marked a turning point, whereby settler colonial injustices have since been systematically included in the curriculum. This is explored through a case study analysis of the two iterations of the Victorian Curriculum: History post-Apology— 2012 and 2016—the latter of which remains in current use. Using discourse analysis methods, this article argues that the inclusion of colonial injustice in the post-Apology era signals a consensus that has emerged around the significance of representing injustice in history curriculum, and by extension, for shaping future citizens. Through close textual analysis of the curriculum documents, this article finds that representations of historical injustice have been organized by four frames: memorialization, equivalence, personalization, and human rights. It argues that these frames curtail opportunities for the development of an understanding of the structural character and effects of settler colonialism, and limit consideration of the longer history of Indigenous sovereignty and self-determination. These failures raise questions about how impending reforms might respond to the contemporary political context where treaty negotiations and formal truth-telling with First Nations’ polities are unfolding.
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    MayDay colloquium: Social media for good or evil in music learning & teaching
    Sirek, D ; Waldron, J ; Cowan, J ; Simpson, R (Canadian Band Association, 2023)