Melbourne Graduate School of Education - Research Publications

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    Creative Pedagogies with Technology: Future Proofing Teaching Training in Music
    de Bruin, L ; Merrick, B ; Henriksen, D ; Mishra, P (Springer International Publishing, 2022)
    In this chapter, the authors will consider the benefits and challenges of enacting creative pedagogical approaches in the tertiary context and examine emerging educational practices about twenty-first century learning and technology. Creativity continues to be a key construct for twenty-first century music education practice and education, incorporating technology that delivers deeper and more profound learning experiences- that paradoxically isolate individual learning yet at the same time provoke reflection, growth, and sustainability. This chapter explores the delivery of a tertiary degree in Music Teaching, specifically addressing the following areas: • Curriculum design, delivery, and assessment, • Entrepreneurial approaches to learning through student centred activity, • Online learning, student access, self-regulation, and self-assessment, • Learning environments (including online and technology-based practice) that mirror global change, capacities, and expectations. Through a combination of annotated examples of teaching practice, selected research, and related theoretical reference, this chapter will propose a range of creative, innovative learning solutions. Importantly, this chapter draws on research undertaken with graduate students after their year of learning during the COVID pandemic and subsequently provides insights into these four areas and their influence on the students’ learning. This is supported by a discussion of a range of teaching approaches and strategies that can be used to foster creativities and shifts in teaching practice.
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    Language Ideology and the Learning of Languages in the Early Childhood Context
    Slaughter, Y ; Nicolas, E (Routledge, 2022-01-01)
    In 2019, the Victorian government introduced the Early Childhood Language Program (ECLP), whereby children in selected Early Childhood (EC) settings play and learn through a language other than English for between 3 and 15 hours per week. Although a small range of bilingual and language programmes do exist at the EC level in Australia, this programme is pioneering in its scope as well as its support for the supernumerary provision of language educators to support language learning at over 150 EC centres. In this chapter, we look at critical questions around language ideologies that shape language choice and programme implementation in EC educational contexts and settings, which arose as we developed and implemented the training programme for the language educators. These issues are examined through the lens of two languages or language groups with complex histories in Australia - Auslan and Victorian Aboriginal Languages - in order to raise critical issues in relation to language and power, who languages belong to, and how their users or custodians are positioned in the deployment of language as a resource in EC settings. We argue that it is imperative that a deep understanding of socio-political and socio-linguistic histories of languages and the teaching and learning of these languages inform the work of researchers, in order to mitigate and avoid the perpetuation of injustices and obstacles experienced by these language communities.
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    Critical Media Literacies and the Digital Game Classroom
    Bacalja, A ; Kist, W ; Christel, M (NCTE, 2022-11-15)
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    Challenging Leadership Norms: A New Way of Thinking About Leadership Preparation
    Acquaro, D ; Gurr, D ; English, FW (Springer International Publishing, 2022)
    Images of principals are often of a seasoned educator well into their teaching career, having risen through the ranks, gaining experience in middle- and senior-level leadership, ideally having completed some form of leadership preparation, and given license to lead a school. Their leadership development, most likely self-managed, perhaps including some formal studies, and most certainly including experience in leadership roles, occurs well into their careers as teachers. So, the idea of introducing pre-service teachers to notions of educational leadership in their initial teacher training is far from conventional thinking. This chapter explores new possibilities in leadership preparation arguing that because today’s teacher graduates are entering educational settings that are rapidly changing and increasing in complexity, they need to be prepared for leadership early in their careers. Distributed leadership structures are now commonplace with increasing opportunities and expectations for leadership across all levels. Graduates entering the profession can find themselves leading very early in their careers without any leadership knowledge, experience, or competencies. This chapter challenges leadership norms by rethinking how we prepare teachers for the profession recognizing the need to better equip teacher graduates for the reality in schools, the changing nature of a teachers’ role, and the need to create a pipeline of experienced leaders to lead the schools of the future. After sections describing the changing nature of schools and school leadership, teacher roles, and initial teacher education (ITE), the chapter considers how ITE courses are responding to these pressures through the provision of leadership learning.
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    Leadership Development in Initial Teacher Education
    Acquaro, D ; Gurr, D ; Peters, MA (Springer Nature Singapore, 2022)
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    Concluding Thoughts and Future Considerations on Innovation in School-University Partnerships in Initial Teacher Education
    Bradbury, O ; Acquaro, D ; Bradbury, O ; Acquaro, D (Springer, 2022)
    Throughout the many examples of school-university partnerships presented in this collection, there are multiple models and designs that constitute a partnership. When we began to develop this edited volume, we had insights into how school-university partnerships within initial teacher education were being formed, as well as a clear understanding of key indicators informing effective partnerships. By the final stages of curating this edited collection, inspired by the innovation we were seeing across Australia, more questions arose relating to the fundamental aspects of partnership design. Is a policy framework necessary for a school-university partnership to be successful? Would school-university partnerships be explored without initial teacher education accreditation requirements mandating formal agreements? Do schools initiate partnerships with universities? Should the focus of school-university partnerships centre around the number of pre-service teacher professional placements in schools? This final chapter explores these provocations and poses further considerations in the hope of advancing discussions on successful school-university partnerships.
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    An Introduction to School-University Partnerships—Innovation in Initial Teacher Education
    Bradbury, O ; Acquaro, D ; Bradbury, O ; Acquaro, D (Springer, 2022-10-15)
    School-university partnerships have now become a fundamental foundation of initial teacher education programs across Australia. Firmly embedded in the program standards required to accredit pre-service teacher preparation courses, the importance of these partnerships is widely recognised. Incentivised through policy, the focus on school-university partnerships is front and centre within initial teacher education; however, the emphasis is now shifting towards the quality and sustainability of partnerships. Embedding of successful sustainable partnerships requires a deep understanding of contextual factors that are both unique and common to each partner. Understanding the strengths and needs of each partner creates the necessary conditions for innovation. This chapter introduces this edited collection of Australian school-university partnerships. The contributions are first-hand accounts from those who oversee the school-university partnership within each institution, providing both theoretical and practical understandings of how these partnerships are formed, their function and future considerations for the sustainability of these partnerships. Each contribution is distinct, each showcasing unique approaches to partnership and each demonstrating the transformation emerging from cross-sectoral collaboration.
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    Value of Mentor Professional Learning Through a Digital Micro-Credential in a School-University Partnership
    Lang, J ; Acquaro, D ; Anderson, M ; Mandouit, L ; Wilson, E ; Favero, E ; Marlow, E ; Bradbury, O ; Acquaro, D (Springer, 2022)
    Effective school-university partnerships not only play an important role in improving the quality of initial teacher education but have the capacity to positively impact practice more broadly in schools. This chapter explores an innovative approach to school-university partnerships through the development of a digital micro-credential professional learning program for mentor teachers aimed specifically at building mentors’ understanding of evidence-based assessment to support differentiated teaching practice. Through a narrative inquiry approach and the reflections from participating mentors and partnership leaders, the data analysed suggest that there are positive impacts across the partnership’s actors and ecosystem. The micro-credential provides upskilling of mentors that then improves the level of support to pre-service teachers when using data to differentiate their teaching, a key aim for the program. Yet, there are broader impacts of the program across the partnership, including changing teaching practices within the participating schools and implications for the university’s academics and their work with teachers and pre-service teachers.
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    An Introduction to School-University Partnerships—Innovation in Initial Teacher Education
    Bradbury, OJ ; Acquaro, D ; Acquaro, D ; Badbury, O (Springer Nature Singapore, 2022)
    School-university partnerships have now become a fundamental foundation of initial teacher education programs across Australia. Firmly embedded in the program standards required to accredit pre-service teacher preparation courses, the importance of these partnerships is widely recognised. Incentivised through policy, the focus on school-university partnerships is front and centre within initial teacher education; however, the emphasis is now shifting towards the quality and sustainability of partnerships. Embedding of successful sustainable partnerships requires a deep understanding of contextual factors that are both unique and common to each partner. Understanding the strengths and needs of each partner creates the necessary conditions for innovation. This chapter introduces this edited collection of Australian school-university partnerships. The contributions are first-hand accounts from those who oversee the school-university partnership within each institution, providing both theoretical and practical understandings of how these partnerships are formed, their function and future considerations for the sustainability of these partnerships. Each contribution is distinct, each showcasing unique approaches to partnership and each demonstrating the transformation emerging from cross-sectoral collaboration.
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    Madrassa (Madrasah)
    Hassim, E ; Anheier, H ; Toepler, S (Springer International Publishing, 2020)