Melbourne Graduate School of Education - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 40
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Feedback in Music Performance Teaching.
    McPherson, GE ; Blackwell, J ; Hattie, J (Frontiers Media SA, 2022)
    The purpose of this article is to provide one prominent perspective from the research literature on a conception of feedback in educational psychology as proposed by John Hattie and colleagues, and to then adapt these concepts to develop a framework that can be applied in music performance teaching at a variety of levels. The article confronts what we see as a lack of understanding about the importance of this topic in music education and provides suggestions that will help music teachers refocus how they use feedback within their teaching. Throughout the article, we draw heavily on the work of John Hattie and his colleagues whose explanations on all facets of feedback, but especially those forms of feedback that are focused on ensuring students understand "where to next"-have had a huge impact on school education through various publications.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Adolescents' longitudinal trajectories of mental health and loneliness: The impact of COVID-19 school closures
    Houghton, S ; Kyron, M ; Hunter, SC ; Lawrence, D ; Hattie, J ; Carroll, A ; Zadow, C (WILEY, 2022-02-14)
    INTRODUCTION: Longitudinal research examining the impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) school closures on the mental health of adolescents is scarce. Prolonged periods of physical and social isolation because of such restrictions may have impacted heavily on adolescents' mental health and loneliness. METHODS: The current study addresses a major gap by examining the impact of school closures on the mental health and loneliness of 785, 10- to 17-year-old Western Australian adolescents (mean age = 14.1, SD = 1.31), who were surveyed across four time points: twice before COVID-19, once as schools closed, and once post reopening of schools. Pre- and post-COVID-19 changes in mental health and loneliness were compared using linear mixed models. Random intercept cross-lagged panel models (RI-CLPMs) assessed temporal associations between loneliness, depression symptoms, and positive mental wellbeing. RESULTS: Compared with pre-COVID-19 symptom levels, there were significant increases in depression symptoms, internalizing and externalizing symptoms, and a significant decrease in positive mental wellbeing at different points over time. Symptom change over time differed according to gender and pre-COVID-19 symptom severity. Significant increases in positive attitudes towards being alone and feelings of isolation occurred at different points over time. Gender differences were evident. RI-CLPMs highlighted the predictive significance of friendship quality and having a negative attitude towards being alone over time in relation to depression symptoms. A positive or negative attitude towards being alone was predictive of positive mental wellbeing over time. CONCLUSION: Findings provide evidence that COVID-19-related school closures adversely affected adolescents' mental health and feelings of loneliness.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Longitudinal trajectories of mental health and loneliness for Australian adolescents with-or-without neurodevelopmental disorders: the impact of COVID-19 school lockdowns
    Houghton, S ; Kyron, M ; Lawrence, D ; Hunter, SC ; Hattie, J ; Carroll, A ; Zadow, C ; Chen, W (WILEY, 2022-02-22)
    BACKGROUND: The impact of COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic school lockdowns on the mental health problems and feelings of loneliness of adolescents with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) is hypothesized to be greater than that of their non-NDD peers. This two and a half year longitudinal study compared changes in the mental health and loneliness of Western Australian adolescents pre-COVID-19 (November 2018 and April 2019), immediately prior to COVID-19 school lockdowns (March 2020), and post schools reopening (July/August 2020). METHODS: An age-and-gender matched sample of 476 adolescents with-or-without NDDs completed online assessments for mental health and loneliness. RESULTS: Adolescents with NDDs reported elevated levels of adverse mental health across all four waves of data collection. These young people experienced little change in mental health problems and feelings of loneliness over time, and any increase during school lockdowns returned to, or fell below pre-COVID-19 levels once schools reopened. In comparison, adolescents without NDDs experienced significant increases from a low baseline in depression symptoms, externalizing symptoms, feelings of isolation, and having a positive attitude to being alone, and evidenced a significant decline in positive mental wellbeing. Quality of friendships were unaffected by COVID-19 school lockdowns for all adolescents regardless of NDD status. Of the adolescents with NDDs, those with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder reported a significant increase in positive mental wellbeing following school lockdowns. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescents with NDDs emerged relatively unscathed from COVID-19 school lockdowns and the short term impacts associated with these were not maintained over time. These findings should be considered in the context of this study's geographical location and the unpredictability of school lockdowns. Learning to live with school lockdowns into the future may be a critical element for further investigation in the context of interventions.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    The importance of passionate individuals for navigating school arts provision in 19 Australian schools
    McFerran, KS ; Crooke, AHD ; Steele, M ; Hattie, J ; McPherson, GE (SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2021-10-31)
    Arts programs are increasingly recognized for their role in promoting student development and cohesive school communities. Yet, most Australian schools are left to navigate a landscape characterized by shifting policy goals and external providers of diverse quality and intent. Drawing on interviews with 27 stakeholders from 19 Catholic primary schools in Melbourne, Australia, we explored key approaches to arts provision in this context, and conditions that hinder and support it. Approaches varied markedly, from school-wide programs embedded across the curriculum, to one-off incursions. Conditions consistently affecting provision ranged from leadership support to a community’s view of the arts. Programs regularly relied on individuals passionate about arts to go beyond their paid roles, yet this frequently jeopardized sustainability. Overall, the approaches identified, and conditions affecting their sustainability, reveal a lack of value for school arts at policy and administration levels. This lack of value is not demonstrated in the provision of other traditional school activities like math or literacy, which begs consideration by policymakers and school administrators.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Actual Interpretations and Use of Scores as Aspects of Validity
    O'Leary, TM ; Hattie, JAC ; Griffin, P (WILEY, 2017-06-01)
    Validity is the most fundamental consideration in test development. Understandably, much time, effort, and money is spent in its pursuit. Central to the modern conception of validity are the interpretations made, and uses planned, on the basis of test scores. There is, unfortunately, however, evidence that test users have difficulty understanding scores as intended. That is, although the proposed interpretations and use of test scores might be theoretically valid they might never come to be because the meaning of the message is lost in translation. This necessitates pause. It is almost absurd to think that the intended interpretations and uses of test scores might fail because there is a lack of alignment with the actual interpretations made and uses enacted by the audience. Despite this, there has only recently been contributions to the literature regarding the interpretability of score reports, the mechanisms by which scores are communicated to their audience, and their relevance to validity. These contributions have focused upon linking, through evidence, the intended interpretation and use with the actual interpretations being made and actions being planned by score users. This article reviews the current conception of validity, validation, and validity evidence with the goal of positioning the emerging notion of validity of usage within the current paradigm.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Surface, Deep, and Transfer? Considering the Role of Content Literacy Instructional Strategies
    Frey, N ; Fisher, D ; Hattie, J (WILEY, 2017-03-01)
    This article provides an organizational review of content literacy instructional strategies to forward a claim that some strategies work better for surface learning, whereas others are more effective for deep learning and still others for transfer learning. The authors argue that the failure to adopt content literacy strategies by disciplinary teachers may be due, in part, to the mismatch between the approach and the level of learning expected.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    An Analysis of an Assessment Tool for 5-year Old Students Entering Elementary School: The School Entry Assessment Kit
    Hattie, JAC ; Brown, GTL ; Irving, SE (SPRINGER INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING AG, 2015-04-01)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Conceptualising Loneliness in Adolescents: Development and Validation of a Self-report Instrument
    Houghton, S ; Hattie, J ; Wood, L ; Carroll, A ; Martin, K ; Tan, C (SPRINGER, 2014-10-01)
    This paper reports the development and psychometric evaluations of a multidimensional model of loneliness in Australian adolescents. In the first study a new instrument was designed and administered to 1,074 adolescents (ages 10-18 years, M = 13.01). An exploratory factor analysis from data supplied by 694 of these participants yielded a 4-factor structure (friendship, isolation, negative attitude to solitude, and positive attitude to solitude). Competing measurement models were then evaluated using confirmatory factor analysis with data from the remaining 380 participants; strong support was demonstrated for the conceptual model. Significant main effects were evident for geographical location (rural remote/urban), age and sex. In a second study, involving 235 Australian adolescents (ages 10.0-16 years, M = 13.8) the superiority of the first-order model represented by four correlated factors was confirmed. The findings have clinical and practical implications for professional groups represented by child and adolescent psychiatry, pediatric and clinical psychology services, researchers, and educators. Specifically, the new self-report instrument identifies adolescents who are at risk of loneliness and its associated adverse outcomes and in doing has the potential to offer new insights into prevention and intervention.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Factors influencing early adolescents' mathematics achievement: High-quality teaching rather than relationships
    Winheller, S ; Hattie, JA ; Brown, GTL (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2013-04-01)
  • Item