Melbourne Graduate School of Education - Research Publications

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    Global science and national comparisons: beyond bibliometrics and scientometrics
    Marginson, S (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2021-10-01)
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    Higher Education and Public Good in East and West
    Marginson, S ; Yang, L ; van’t Land, H ; Corcoran, A ; Iancu, D-C (Springer Link, 2021)
    The 70th year of the IAU has been marked not only by the Covid-19 pandemic but by the geopolitical tension between the United States and China. After almost four decades of cooperation, which began in shared opposition to Soviet Russia and a shared interest in China’s modernisation, the leaders of each country have become strident critics of the other. The escalating war of words has led to disruptions in trade, communications and visas and now threatens the vast and fruitful cooperation between universities and researchers. Much is at stake. Many US universities are in China, such as Stanford with its state-of-the-art centre at Peking University and NYU with a branch campus in Shanghai. Chinese universities benefit from visits in both directions, from bench-marking using American partner templates and from the return of US-trained doctoral graduates. US-China links in science are focused on crucial areas like biomedicine and epidemiology, planetary science and ecology, engineering, materials, energy, cybernetics.
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    And the sky is grey: The ambivalent outcomes of the California Master Plan for Higher Education
    Marginson, S (John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 2018)
    In the 1960 Master Plan for Higher Education, California in the United States famously combined the principles of excellence and access within a steep three-tiered system of Higher Education. It fashioned the world’s strongest system of public research universities, while creating an open access system that brought college to millions of American families for the first time. Since 1960, the Master Plan has been admired and influential across the world. Yet the political and fiscal conditions supporting the Master Plan have now evaporated. California turns away hundreds of thousands of prospective students each year, and the University of California, facing spiralling deficits, finds it more difficult to maintain operating costs and compete with top private universities for leading researchers. The paper discusses the rise and partial fall of the Californian system as embodied in the Master Plan, and identifies general lessons for Higher Education systems.
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    What drives global science? The four competing narratives
    Marginson, S (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2021-06-16)
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    Individual and collective outcomes of higher education: a comparison of Anglo-American and Chinese approaches
    Marginson, S ; Yang, L (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2021-05-27)
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    'All things are in flux': China in global science
    Marginson, S (SPRINGER, 2021-05-29)
    Since 1990, a large and dynamic global science system has evolved, based on grass roots collaboration, and resting on the resources, infrastructure and personnel housed by national science systems. Euro-American science systems have become intensively networked in a global duopoly; and many other countries have built national science systems, including a group of large- and middle-sized countries that follow semi-autonomous trajectories based on state investment, intensive national network building, and international engagement, without integrating tightly into the global duopoly. The dual global/national approach pursued by these systems, including China, South Korea, Iran and India, is not always fully understood in papers on science. Nevertheless, China is now the number two science country in the world, the largest producer of papers and number one in parts of STEM physical sciences. The paper investigates the remarkable evolution of China's science funding, output, discipline balance, internationalisation strategy and national and global networking. China has combined global activity and the local/national building of science in positive sum manner, on the ground of the nationally nested science system. The paper also discusses limits of the achievement, noting that while China-US relations have been instrumental in building science, a partial decoupling is occurring and the future is unclear.
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    Hayekian neo-liberalism and academic freedom
    MARGINSON, S (Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia, 2006)
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    Global University Rankings: Implications in general and for Australia
    Marginson, S (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2007-01-01)
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    The limits of market reform in higher education
    Marginson, S (Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University, 2018-01-01)