Faculty of Education - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 893
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Assessment reform for the age of artificial intelligence
    Lodge, J ; Howard, S ; Bearman, M ; Dawson, P (Australian Government, Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency, 2023)
    The emergence of generative artificial intelligence (AI), while creating new possibilities for learning and teaching, has exacerbated existing assessment challenges within higher education. However, there is considerable expertise, based on evidence, theory and practice, about how to design assessment for a digital world, which includes artificial intelligence. AI is not new, after all. This document, constructed through expert collaboration, draws on this body of knowledge and outlines directions for the future of assessment. It seeks to provide guidance for the sector on ways assessment practices can take advantage of the opportunities, and manage the risks, of AI, specifically generative AI.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Where powerful knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge intersect: the case of knowledge and beliefs for teaching school geography through inquiry
    Lee, SJ ; Kriewaldt, J (Taylor and Francis Group, 2024)
    Despite global interest in inquiry as a teaching and learning approach for school geography, little is known about teachers’ knowledge and beliefs for teaching geography through inquiry. This paper reports on findings from a survey of 44 Victorian secondary teachers’ knowledge, beliefs and practice of teaching geography through inquiry. Our findings reveal that geography teachers believe in the power of geographical knowledge to influence young people’s attitudes, values, emotions and ethical action and the power of incorporating geography inquiry to deliver these ambitious educational goals. This paper concludes that knowledge for teaching geography through inquiry is a dynamic collection of rich and situated knowledge constructed in and with practice, and teachers’ beliefs are deeply intertwined. These conclusions augment Shulman’s concept of pedagogical content knowledge by incorporating concepts of powerful knowledge and curriculum-making, signalling a way forward on knowledge for teaching powerful subject knowledge through inquiry. We argue that geography inquiry is key to experiencing and developing powerful knowledge in geography. Disciplinary inquiry supports, even gives flesh to, Young’s vision of a Future 3 curriculum.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    An A/r/tographic Blueprint for Walking in Four Propositions
    Coleman, K ; Cook, PJ ; Irwin, RL ; Lee, NYS ; Baldus, AI ; Barney, DT ; Ursino, JM ; Eskandary, ZV (InSEA Publications, 2024-05-01)
    Our life narratives are intertwined and entangled with/in art, research and teaching. As digital a/r/tographers, our place stories have connections that have connected us further across spaces and sites. These are multiplicitous and invite new inter-actions and intra-actions across times. We-searching (Holman Jones & Harris, 2019) with Haraway digitally is an experiment that we followed as a series of propositions during 2020. A turn in our life narratives that hold us, yet opens us to living and working with and through the human, non-human and more-than-human interests us as re-searchers. This a/r/tographic blueprint for walking in four propositions explores making kin as a/r/tographers that work in often contested spaces of conservative educational research and across disciplinary boundaries.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Drawing, Writing, and Walking: An A/r/t/graphic Proposition in 7 Prompts
    Mallos, M ; Sajadi, N ; Coleman, KS ; Irwin, RL ; Lee, NYS ; Baldus, AI ; Barney, DT ; Ursino, JM ; Eskandary, ZV (InSEA Publications, 2024-05-01)
    This co-storied a/r/tographic proposition in seven prompts has been designed by three a/r/tographers at different stages of knowing between themselves, their worlds, and their practices in and through a/r/tography. We have co-designed these seven prompts in response to the renderings of a/r/tography from the spaces and places we have found ourselves in 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic. We live in the same city but each of our a/r/tographic practices and our inquiries differ. Our practices of living, walking, being, working, and travelling explore how the radical relatedness and collaborations (Bickel et al., 2010) found within an a/r/tography pedagogy and methodology occur. “Radical relatedness leads to further knowledge sources and cross disciplinary experience in regard to relational aesthetics, relational inquiry, and relational learning” (Bickel et al., 2010, p. 98). We believe that collaboration is central to our work as researchers and practitioners—we learn through, with, and together.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    A Student-Centric Evaluation of a Program Addressing Prevention of Gender-Based Violence in Three African Countries
    Cahill, H ; Dadvand, B ; Suryani, A ; Farrelly, A (MDPI AG, 2023-08-01)
    Studies investigating the effectiveness of school-related gender-based violence prevention programs seldom report on the extent to which students themselves value and recommend such programs. Yet, along with evidence about effectiveness in relation to shifts in knowledge, attitudes, or intentions, student-valuing is a significant indicator that the programs can make a positive contribution to students' lives. This mixed-method study analyses survey and focus group data collected from ninety-two schools in three African countries (Tanzania, Zambia, and Eswatini). Students found the program contributed to improved peer relationships and identified the five most useful components as learning about gender equality and human rights, learning how to obtain help for those affected by violence, understanding and communicating about their emotions, strategies to avoid joining in with bullying and harassment, and understanding the effects of gender-based violence.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Support for Dyscalculia
    Sze, J (Mathematical Association of Victoria, 2024-04)
    In January 2022 after months of research on finding an appropriate professional body to learn more about dyscalculia. I could not find any organisations that offer a practical course with evidence-based research on how to teach students with maths learning difficulties in Australia. Through prior Professional Learning at SPELD Victoria, I encountered Dyscalculia Association UK and started the year long online course. The course is an interactive hands-on course designed by Professor Steve Chinn and Judy Hornigold of the Dyscalculia Association UK. The following reflection is the Final Practicum I submitted after successfully completing 10 hours of teaching maths to a group of learning difficulties students in year 6. In this article, I have outlined critical evaluation and reflection on the lessons. I have included a structure of a multisensory maths lesson plan based on the Singapore Maths pedagogy (Chinn, 2017; Hornigold, 2017). I then tailored the lessons to the students’ learning needs and teach them accordingly.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Inclusive gaming through AI: a perspective for identifying opportunities and obstacles through co-design with people living with MND
    Dwyer, N ; Harrison, M ; O'Mara, B ; Harley, K (Frontiers Media S.A., 2024-04-10)
    This interdisciplinary research initiative seeks to enhance the accessibility of video gaming for individuals living with Motor Neurone Disease (MND), a condition characterized by progressive muscle weakness. Gaming serves as a social and recreational outlet for many, connecting friends, family, and even strangers through collaboration and competition. However, MND’s disease progression, including muscle weakness and paralysis, severely limit the ability to engage in gaming. In this paper, we desscribe our exploration of AI solutions to improve accessibility to gaming. We argue that any application of accessible AI must be led by lived experience. Notably, we found in our previous scoping review, existing academic research into video games for those living with MND largely neglects the experiences of MND patients in the context of video games and AI, which was a prompt for us to address this critical gap.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Growing up in Victoria, Australia, in the midst of the climate emergency
    Chavez, KM ; Quinn, P ; Gibbs, L ; Block, K ; Leppold, C ; Stanley, J ; Vella-Brodrick, D (SAGE Publications, 2024-03)
    Children and young people (henceforth referred to as young people) are one of the groups most affected by climate change and are at the forefront of climate action. Yet, there is scarce evidence on how young people navigate the challenges presented by climate change using their personal strengths and the resources accessible to them. This study aimed to address this gap by drawing on qualitative data from workshops with 31 young people between 12 and 22 years of age from metropolitan Melbourne and a bushfire-risk region in Victoria, Australia. An inductive thematic analysis of workshop transcripts showed that participants had progressively become aware of climate change in an increasingly uncertain world and sought to gain a sense of connection, agency, and hope. Participants aimed to achieve the latter by becoming aware of opportunities for climate actions in everyday life and developing themselves as agents of change. We discussed our findings from a developmental perspective to gain a better understanding of how supporting young people in learning about and acting on climate change can benefit their mental health and sense of agency.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Conceptualising multilingualism in higher education in Timor-Leste: the case of petroleum studies
    Newman, T (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2022-05-19)
    In this paper I present a critical discussion of the ways that multilingualism is conceptualised in the context of higher education in Timor-Leste, a small, developing nation in South-East Asia. Drawing on a range of ethnographic data collected at multiple Timorese tertiary institutions from 2015 to 2018, I focus especially on the language-related beliefs and practices of a small group of petroleum studies lecturers, who are at the meeting point of diverse ideological forces that impact their teaching. I discuss their conceptualisations of both the ‘language problem’ facing them, and their own hybrid classroom communication practices, examining how these conceptualisations are shaped by wider political discourses favouring Portuguese, Indonesian and English. I argue that these discourses not only complicate due recognition of the considerable resourcefulness these lecturers display in communicating disciplinary knowledge to students, but also weigh heavily on their own perceptions of their everyday work as tertiary educators.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Tetun akademiku: University lecturers' roles in the intellectualisation of Tetum
    Newman, T (Springer, 2021-02)
    In this article I examine lecturers’ beliefs about the use of Tetum for academic, scientific and vocational communication at university in Timor-Leste and discuss the discursive and performative language planning roles that they play in the intellectualisation of the language. Drawing on analysis of recorded discussions among university lecturers from different disciplinary areas and distinct institutional settings, I identify a range of discursive and ideological forces being brought to bear on the use of Tetum to communicate disciplinary and professional knowledge. I focus especially on lecturers’ value-laden explanations for how and why they ‘mix’ Tetum with Portuguese, English and Indonesian in particular contexts of classroom communication. Lecturers’ statements about the limitations of Tetum for academic and scientific communication, while grounded in the real need for coordinated intellectualisation of the language, also mask lecturers’ individual preferences for (and greater confidence in) the use of more established ‘academic languages’, stemming from their own past experiences of language socialisation. I argue that these negative beliefs about the potential reach of Tetum reinforce hegemonic discourses that work against its coordinated intellectualisation. Meanwhile, significant individual efforts towards the intellectualisation of Tetum endure in the form of innovative translation and translanguaging work; efforts that I argue require greater attention and support. I conclude with a discussion about the need to recognise and value the expertise and contributions of multiple stakeholders in the development and intellectualisation of the Tetum language, including those who are not traditionally understood as ‘language experts’.