Faculty of Education - Research Publications

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    Leisure activity engagement as a predictor for quality of life in community-Dwelling older adults
    Marufkhani, V ; Mohammadi, F ; Mirzadeh, M ; Allen, K-A ; Motalebi, SA (WOLTERS KLUWER MEDKNOW PUBLICATIONS, 2021-01-01)
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    Student belongingness in higher education: Lessons for Professors from the COVID-19 pandemic
    Tice, D ; Baumeister, R ; Crawford, J ; Allen, K-A ; Percy, A (University of Wollongong, 2021-01-01)
    ‘To learn about X, observe what happens to the system when X is removed.’ What happens to the higher education student experience when, during a pandemic, so many of the avenues for building a sense of belonging are radically and fundamentally disrupted? How should we respond as individuals, a collective and a sector, to redress this? The national student survey data in Australia has highlighted a significant drop in learner engagement and their sense of belonging as a result of the pandemic. Indeed, the pandemic has been a significant point of anxiety for students, educators, and universities globally. We see the pandemic as a unique opportunity to critically examine belongingness among university students in a climate where their normal avenues to feel they belong need to establish a new kind of normal. In this article, we seek to articulate what can be learned from the pandemic experience about student belongingness and what instructors can do to improve it, even under difficult circumstances. We found opportunities to strengthen a students’ sense of belonging in online environments, when necessary, and how responses within the constraints of lockdown and emergency remote teaching can still support student success.
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    Work like a girl: Redressing gender inequity in academia through systemic solutions
    Allen, K-A ; Butler-Henderson, K ; Reupert, A ; Longmuir, F ; Finefter-Rosenbluh, I ; Berger, E ; Grove, C ; Heffernan, A ; Freeman, N ; Kewalramani, S ; Krebs, S ; Dsouza, L ; Mackie, G ; Chapman, D ; Fleer, M (University of Wollongong, 2021-01-01)
    Historically, the professional structure of higher education has provided restricted employment, career, and leadership opportunities for women. This is exacerbated where there is an intersection between gender and race, culture, religion, or age. Women continue to be underrepresented in senior leadership positions across a range of disciplines, and this lack of representation of women within the professional structure of higher education itself acts as a barrier for more women reaching senior levels within institutions. More women are needed in higher positions to increase representation and visibility, and to encourage and mentor others to then aspire to follow a similar path. This critical review examines gender equity across the major career benchmarks of the academy in light of the impact of the personal contexts of women, systemic processes, and cultural barriers that hinder career progression. Research-based systemic solutions that work towards improved gender equity for women are discussed. The findings from this critical review highlight the need for global systemic change in higher education to create ethical equities in the employment, career, and leadership opportunities for women.
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    Building better schools with evidence-based policy: Adaptable policy for teachers and school leaders
    Allen, KA ; Reupert, A ; Oades, L ; Allen, K-A ; Reupert, A ; Oades, L (Routledge, 2021-04-29)
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    Belonging: a review of conceptual issues, an integrative framework, and directions for future research
    Allen, K-A ; Kern, ML ; Rozek, CS ; McInerney, DM ; Slavich, GM (TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2021-01-02)
    OBJECTIVE: A sense of belonging-the subjective feeling of deep connection with social groups, physical places, and individual and collective experiences-is a fundamental human need that predicts numerous mental, physical, social, economic, and behavioural outcomes. However, varying perspectives on how belonging should be conceptualised, assessed, and cultivated has hampered much-needed progress on this timely and important topic. To address these critical issues, we conducted a narrative review that summarizes existing perspectives on belonging, describes a new integrative framework for understanding and studying belonging, and identifies several key avenues for future research and practice. METHOD: We searched relevant databases, including Google Scholar, PubMed, Scopus, PsycInfo, and ClinicalTrials.gov, for articles describing belonging, instruments for assessing belonging, and interventions for increasing belonging. RESULTS: By identifying the core components of belonging, we introduce a new integrative framework for understanding, assessing, and cultivating belonging that focuses on four interrelated components: competencies, opportunities, motivations, and perceptions. CONCLUSION: This integrative framework enhances our understanding of the basic nature and features of belonging, provides a foundation for future interdisciplinary research on belonging and belongingness, and highlights how a robust sense of belonging may be cultivated to improve human health and resilience for individuals and communities worldwide.
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    Introducing a dual continuum model of belonging and loneliness
    Lim, MH ; Allen, K-A ; Furlong, MJ ; Craig, H ; Smith, DC (TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2021-01-02)
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    Spiritual Well-Being, Social Support, and Financial Distress in Determining Depression: The Mediating Role of Impact of Event During COVID-19 Pandemic in Iran
    Nia, HS ; Gorgulu, O ; Naghavi, N ; Robles-Bello, MA ; Sanchez-Teruel, D ; Fomani, FK ; She, L ; Rahmatpour, P ; Allen, K-A ; Arslan, G ; Sharif, SP (FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2021-10-28)
    This study investigates the relationship between spiritual well-being, social support, and financial distress with depressive symptoms due to the COVID-19 pandemic. A path analysis was used to analyze data collected from 1,156 Iranian participants via an online survey. The results showed that spiritual well-being and social support were negatively related to depressive symptoms and financial distress. The impact of COVID-19 events showed negative associations with depressive symptoms. In addition, the link between spiritual well-being and financial distress with depressive symptoms was partially mediated by the impact of events.
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    Exploring the experiences of nurses' moral distress in long-term care of older adults: a phenomenological study
    Nasrabadi, AN ; Wibisono, AH ; Allen, K-A ; Yaghoobzadeh, A ; Bit-Lian, Y (BMC, 2021-08-31)
    BACKGROUND: Moral distress is a poorly defined and frequently misunderstood phenomenon, and little is known about its triggering factors during ICU end-of-life decisions for nurses in Iran. This study aimed to explore the experiences of nurses' moral distress in the long-term care of older adults via a phenomenological study. METHODS: A qualitative, phenomenological study was conducted with 9 participants using in-depth semi-structured interviews. The purpose was to gain insight into the lived experiences and perceptions of moral distress among ICU nurses in hospitals affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences during their long-term care of older adults. RESULTS: Five major themes are identified from the interviews: advocating, defense mechanisms, burden of care, relationships, and organizational issues. In addition, several subthemes emerged including respectful end of life care, symptom management, coping, spirituality, futile care, emotional work, powerlessness, relationships between patients and families, relationships with healthcare teams, relationships with institutions, inadequate staffing, inadequate training, preparedness, education/mentoring, workload, and support. CONCLUSIONS: This qualitative study contributes to the limited knowledge and understanding of the challenges nurses face in the ICU. It also offers possible implications for implementing supportive interventions.
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    School belonging: The importance of student and teacher relationships
    Allen, KA ; Slaten, CD ; Arslan, G ; Roffey, S ; Craig, H ; Vella-Brodrick, DA ; Kern, ML ; Wehmeyer, ML (Springer International Publishing, 2021-06-24)
    Abstract School belonging is associated with a range of positive educational and developmental outcomes, including psychosocial health and wellbeing, prosocial behaviour and academic achievement, and transition into adulthood. However, an increasing number of students worldwide report not feeling a sense of belonging to their school. There is growing research evidence that strong student–teacher relationships can promote school belonging, however creating these relationships within highly complex educational systems can be challenging. Further, only a few interventions focusing specifically on belonging that are available in schools have been found to be effective. This chapter highlights the importance of teacher support for a student’s sense of school belonging, discusses challenges associated with student–teacher relationships, and points to strategies for building strong relationships. We highlight the role that school leaders play in fostering strong relationships, and consider extensions within higher education, and future directions. Considering the importance of student–teacher relationships towards a student’s sense of school belonging, and the empirical base that points to both short- and long-term outcomes, implications for widespread benefits are possible for schools that prioritize and value positive relationships between staff and students.
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    Information communication technology use and school belonging in Australian high school students
    McCahey, A ; Allen, K-A ; Arslan, G (WILEY, 2021-12)
    Abstract School belonging is an important component of adolescent well‐being, yet little is known about its relationship with adolescents' Information Communication Technology (ICT) use. This study aimed to examine the relationship between school belonging and various ICT use types in Australian adolescents. The sample was drawn from 14,530 Australian students in Grade 7 or higher, who completed the 2015 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development's Program for International Student Assessment survey. A hierarchical regression analysis was conducted to investigate the relationship between self‐reported measures of school belonging and ICT use at home for schoolwork and ICT use at home for leisure, adjusting for covariates (age, gender, and economic, social, and cultural status). The regression model accounted for 3% of the variability of sense of school belonging, R2 = 0.03, F(5, 10196) = 60.00, p < .001. After adjusting for covariates, more frequent ICT use at home for schoolwork predicted a higher sense of school belonging. Conversely, more frequent ICT use at home for leisure predicted lower levels of sense of school belonging. The way adolescents engage with ICT is important for a student's sense of school belonging, and the present findings have implications for researchers and psychologists.