Faculty of Education - Research Publications

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    Encountering a Pedagogy of the World in a University Setting
    Healy, S ; Coleman, K ; Sallis, RJ ; Belton, A ; Riddle, S ; Heffernan, A ; Bright, D (Taylor & Francis, 2021)
    Taking up Biesta’s (2019) notion of a pedagogy of the world, we ask: How might participating in an arts-based educational program with/in a university enable young people from schools with low Index of Community Socio-Educational Advantage (ICSEA) values to encounter the world of higher education differently and become different in that encounter? This chapter comes from our engagement with empirical material generated during a (post)qualitative inquiry into the pedagogy of The Art of Engagement-a multi-arts studio program involving relational pedagogy and a/r/tography as curriculum located in SPACE, 1 whereby secondary school students from schools in less socio-educationally advantaged communities came together with undergraduate university students for a five-day intensive within a University of Melbourne breadth subject. The program’s rationale was to connect with secondary school arts students completing their schooling in lower ICSEA value schools 2 through the design of authentic university encounters with/in site, practices and communities. It welcomed the secondary school students into the world of our university and enhanced their capacity to “be at home” in this world, creating the conditions for considering and potentially living different post-school futures.
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    Encountering a Pedagogy of the World in a University Setting
    Healy, S ; Coleman, K ; Johnson Sallis, R ; Belton, A ; Bright, D ; Heffernan, A ; Riddle, S (Routledge, 2021)
    Taking up Biesta's (2019) notion of a pedagogy of the world, we ask: How might participating in an arts-based educational program with/in a university enable young people from schools with low Index of Community Socio-Educational Advantage (ICSEA) values to encounter the world of higher education differently and become different in that encounter? This chapter comes from our engagement with empirical material generated during a (post)qualitative inquiry into the pedagogy of The Art of Engagement—a multi-arts studio program involving relational pedagogy and a/r/tography as curriculum located in SPACE, 1 whereby secondary school students from schools in less socio-educationally advantaged communities came together with undergraduate university students for a five-day intensive within a University of Melbourne breadth subject. The program's rationale was to connect with secondary school arts students completing their schooling in lower ICSEA value schools 2 through the design of authentic university encounters with/in site, practices and communities. It welcomed the secondary school students into the world of our university and enhanced their capacity to “be at home” in this world, creating the conditions for considering and potentially living different post-school futures.
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    ‘Mixed-tape Methods’ for Data in Post-digital Times of Disease
    Coleman, K ; Spreadborough, K ; Belton, A ; Cochrane, T (Technology Knowledge & Society Research Network, 2021-04-08)
    In 2020, our teaching and research moved almost exclusively online. Zoom was a must have tool for communication. The shift online has impacted our academic, research, and teaching practices. But can the data traces generated by this shift be leveraged to understand and enhance how we work in and for education? We propose that, as knowledge makers, relational feedback loops and ‘mixed-tape methods’ can create new ways for do-ing, be-ing and know-ing from one data site to another. Doing research during a time of disruption using an iterative approach allows us to adapt the methods as our work and life circumstances changed in response to the pandemic, throughout the uncertainties of life in lockdown we collaboratively co-designed our work. The work of co-designing feedback loops in partnership highlight how the digital enables experience and engagement that generates new experiences and engagements, enabling us to establish new ways of exploring new possibilities with/in. The uncertain unknowns of a covid-normal arts sector means that co-designed arts education gives some solid ground for teachers and learners to create and navigate their future paths. We will present and perform the effects of these experiences and engagements on artists and the arts community in a pandemic and explore the affects of these experiences and engagements for education. We acknowledge that we live and work on the lands of the Wurundjeri people that hold stories across time and space. #Datacreativities is a co-lab of interdisciplinary digital research cross faculty partnership, we examine #datacreative using feedback loops.
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    Be-ing, Doing and Knowing: A Speculative Care Through Constellations Model for ePortfolio
    Martin, B ; Coleman, K ; Sumner, T ; Stevens, CP ; Stolins, R ; Ramirez, B ; Blevins, SJ ; Hood, C ; Reynolds, C ; Svatos, D (Association for Authentic, Experiential, and Evidence-Based Learning, 2021)
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    Doing Digital and Visual Autoethnography
    Coleman, K ; Adams, TE ; Holman Jones, S ; Ellis, C (Routledge, 2021)
    This chapter is a letter to you and me about my travels in/to digital and visual autoethnography. Dear you, explores these travels through digitally drawing and writing the sites and sights as matter mappings. As a speculative practitioner researcher my placestories are mapped between sites for becoming teachers and becoming autoethnographers to consider their own travels and journeys in/to autoethnography. In writing and mapping my way in and through my digital and visual da[r]ta as practice, I was write-ing and rite-ing through site-ing and cite-ing my stories into place. This chapter asked me to listen deeply to multiple voices, and sight spaces as places of knowing. Writing to you and me allowed that these voices and placestories be located and held in this Handbook as digital and visual autoethnography. “The second edition of this seminal text in the field of autoethnography considers the development and establishing of a fast-moving discipline since the publication of the first edition.”
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    Finding your people: A co-storied critical autoethnography
    Coleman, K ; McNally, C ; Martin, B ; Colkert, L ; Penny Light, T ; Carswell, MA (Dio Press Incorporated, 2021-04)
    This book provides readers with the structure and motivation to surface, share, and engage with their own stories of teaching and learning, and to invite their colleagues into the process, to collectively consider the possibilities for ...
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    What the arts teach and how it shows (in the time of COVID-19)
    Selkrig, M ; Coleman, K ; MacDonald, A (Australian Education Union (Victoria Branch), 2020)
    The place and role of the arts within school curriculum (and more broadly in society) has always been and remains fragile and contested (Selkrig & Bottrell, 2018). As we have re-positioned ourselves, readied our classrooms and laptops for a return to another term in stage 3 lockdown, we can again feel the weight on the arts to provide the play, wellbeing and creative space to support the anxieties and fears of students and their families across our schools. Our fragility is clearly manifested in this time of COVID-19 where, while living in a state that prides itself as the arts and cultural centre of the nation, the arts sector in Victoria closed rapidly, had a short stint at opening up and again has had to close the doors. The arts in 2020 have found themselves in dire straits, with artists and arts workers across industries continuing to wonder what the future of the arts could be like post-covid. While we have seen small glimpses of a new normal for the arts between stage 3 first round and stage 3 second round, it is still the arts that buoy us with care and empathy as we head back into lockdown in metropolitan Melbourne. There is ample evidence from various parts of the world (including Australia) that highlight the value and benefits of the arts and arts rich learning environments for young people before and during COVID-19. Despite this, the arts can become diminished in school settings due to competing demands on time and space.
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    Developing Learning-Centered Approaches across the Discipline: Implementing Curated ePortfolios in Information Technology and International Studies
    Coleman, K ; McKenzie, S ; Wilkinson, C ; Dellinger, MA ; Hart, DA (The WAC Clearinghouse; University Press of Colorado, 2021-05)
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    The Learner-Teacher Portfolio Journey: Developing Self-Efficacy and Self-Determination in the Medical Sciences
    Polly, P ; Coleman, K ; Fath, T ; Thai, T ; Yang, J-L ; Dellinger, MA ; Hart, DA (The WAC Clearinghouse; University Press of Colorado, 2021-05)
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    Scicurious as method: Learning from GLAM Young People Living in a Pandemic about Cultivating Digital Co-Research-Creation Spaces that Ignite Curiosity and Creativity
    Coleman, K ; Healy, S ; Wouters, N ; Martin, J ; Campbell, L ; Peck, S ; Belton, A ; Hiscock, R ; Kara, H ; Khoo, S-M (Policy Press, 2020)
    Could COVID-​19, this unexpected crisis, act as a comma 6 in a co-​research-​creation project to become a breathing space and not a full stop? Maybe this pause is a colon: the two different periods of the project (and life in general) on either side of the pandemic, equally important and dependent on each other for full meaning. In this chapter, we tell the story of how a co-​research-​creation event (the Sci Curious Project) unfolded before and during the COVID-​19 pandemic 7 ; the lead-​up to its irruption (St. Pierre, 1997) and then what came after. ‘Scicurious as method’ emerged out of the unexpected pause and recalibration of the project; a method that emphasizes the creation of research spaces that activate scicuriosity in situated practice. We understand scicuriosity as emerging from collaborative research-​creation events that ignite curiosity and creativity. Scicurious as method is presented through an encounter with speculative fiction and scicurious zine travels. Scicurious as method has significant ethical implications, these reify the potential of co-​designed speculative inquiries with creativity and curiosity at their heart. This is, in part, due to its contingency on cultivating digital co-​research-​creation spaces that enfold rather than eschew the analogue and highlight the joyous potential of a deeply situated, co-​designed speculative inquiry; an inquiry with galleries, libraries, archives and museums (GLAM) young people living in a pandemic.