Faculty of Education - Research Publications

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    Online Citizenship Learning of Chinese Young People
    Fu, J ; Peterson, A ; Stahl, G ; Soong, H (Springer, 2020-01-01)
    This chapter examines Chinese young people’s citizenship learning through their participatory activities on the Internet. The discussions presented in this chapter are informed by recent developments in citizenship studies which maintain that citizenship learning is a lifelong process of participation in different formal and informal communities and practices (Biesta et al. 2009) and in the meaning-making activities reflected in various forms of social participation (Hoskins et al. 2012). Two intertwined forms of citizenship learning were identified from Chinese young people’s online activities. The first is young people’s learning about online citizenships through engaging with different virtual communities. Their learning of online citizenships is illustrated by their understanding of the norms and communal practices shaped by the shared language, values, attitudes, and joint enterprises for mutual engagement in these virtual communities. The second is their internet-mediated learning about Chinese society. The Chinese internet, in this case, offers a new way of engaging with and learning about Chinese society. The outcome of these two forms of learning constitutes the landscape of practice upon which their notion of Chinese citizenship is drawn. This chapter draws attention to the digital and constitutive nature of young people’s social engagement in defining new forms of citizenship which are meaningful and relevant to their everyday lives (Lister, 2007; Wood, 2014).
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    Encountering a Pedagogy of the World in a University Setting
    Healy, S ; Coleman, K ; Sallis, RJ ; Belton, A ; Riddle, S ; Heffernan, A ; Bright, D (Taylor & Francis, 2021)
    Taking up Biesta’s (2019) notion of a pedagogy of the world, we ask: How might participating in an arts-based educational program with/in a university enable young people from schools with low Index of Community Socio-Educational Advantage (ICSEA) values to encounter the world of higher education differently and become different in that encounter? This chapter comes from our engagement with empirical material generated during a (post)qualitative inquiry into the pedagogy of The Art of Engagement-a multi-arts studio program involving relational pedagogy and a/r/tography as curriculum located in SPACE, 1 whereby secondary school students from schools in less socio-educationally advantaged communities came together with undergraduate university students for a five-day intensive within a University of Melbourne breadth subject. The program’s rationale was to connect with secondary school arts students completing their schooling in lower ICSEA value schools 2 through the design of authentic university encounters with/in site, practices and communities. It welcomed the secondary school students into the world of our university and enhanced their capacity to “be at home” in this world, creating the conditions for considering and potentially living different post-school futures.
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    Scicurious as method: Learning from GLAM young people living in a pandemic about cultivating digital co-research-creation spaces that ignite curiosity and creativity
    Coleman, K ; Healy, S ; Wouters, N ; Martin, J ; Campbell, L ; Peck, S ; Belton, A ; Hiscock, R ; Kara, H ; Khoo, S-M (Bristol University Press, 2020-10-23)
    Could COVID-19, this unexpected crisis, act as a comma in a co-research-creation project to become a breathing space and not a full stop? Maybe this pause is a colon: the two different periods of the project (and life in general) on either side of the pandemic, equally important and dependent on each other for full meaning. In this chapter, we tell the story of how a co-research-creation event (the Sci Curious Project) unfolded before and during the COVID-19 pandemic; the lead-up to its irruption (St. Pierre, 1997) and then what came after. ‘Scicurious as method’ emerged out of the unexpected pause and recalibration of the project; a method that emphasizes the creation of research spaces that activate scicuriosity in situated practice. We understand scicuriosity as emerging from collaborative research-creation events that ignite curiosity and creativity. Scicurious as method is presented through an encounter with speculative fiction and scicurious zine travels. Scicurious as method has significant ethical implications, these reify the potential of co-designed speculative inquiries with creativity and curiosity at their heart. This is, in part, due to its contingency on cultivating digital co-research-creation spaces that enfold rather than eschew the analogue and highlight the joyous potential of a deeply situated, co-designed speculative inquiry; an inquiry with galleries, libraries, archives and museums (GLAM) young people living in a pandemic.
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    Early Childhood STEM Education: An International Perspective of a Developing Field
    Campbell, C ; Speldewinde, C ; Peters, MA (Springer, 2021)
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    Madrassa (Madrasah)
    Hassim, E ; Anheier, H ; Toepler, S (Springer International Publishing, 2020)
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    Wellbeing literacy as an emancipatory and transformative capability
    Oades, LG ; Taylor, JA ; Francis, J ; Baker, LM ; White, MA ; McCallum, F (Routledge, 2021-05-19)
    Wellbeing Literacy (WL) is conceptualised as the habitual, intentional language use about and for the wellbeing of self and the wellbeing of others. It is language use capability, what we can be and what we can do, with language, for the sake of wellbeing of oneself or others. We argue that this capability can be transformative and emancipatory for individuals and communities, enabling one to live a life with value, freedom and wellbeing. Wellbeing literacy, and its six modes of communication, link well with existing literacy curriculum and structures within education systems. An opportunity exists amongst the crisis to change education broadly and, specifically, wellbeing and resilience education through the intentional use of language about and for wellbeing, during times of adversity and change. This chapter discusses wellbeing literacy, as a model and capability for transforming wellbeing and wellbeing education, both during and post the COVID-19 pandemic.
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    “There’s More Going On”: Critical Digital Game Literacies and the Imperative of Praxis
    Bacalja, A ; Ávila, J (BRILL, 2021-05-31)
    Digital games represent ubiquitous forms of everyday social and cultural activity. Young people are engaging with these texts across a range of physical and digital spaces, and the speed with which digital game literacies have evolved has raised questions about how teachers can support their students to be critical participants in a digital game literacy world. In this chapter, I explore a case study that involved the development and delivery of an Indigenous storytelling unit combining the play and study of a digital game with a short animation film. The first part of this chapter details the nature of the intervention, including brief descriptions of activities from the case study, highlighting the challenge of progressing beyond literary approaches to texts that focus on decoding and engaging with authors’ intended meanings. The second part engages more closely with Critical Digital Literacies praxis (), re-examining the intervention with the assistance of Luci Pangrazio’s (, ) Critical Digital Design approach. The aim is to demonstrate how both students and teachers can encourage border-crossing in terms of what texts we bring to the literacy classroom and the critical dispositions we seek to nurture.
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    Critical Digital Literacy
    Bacalja, A ; Aguilera, E ; Castrillon-Angel, E ; Pandya, JZ ; Mora, R ; Alford, J ; Golden, N ; De Roock, R (Routledge, 2021-01-01)
    This chapter overviews critical digital literacy (CDL). The concept of CDL has been used to describe literacy practices which (1) lead to the creation of digital texts that interrogate issues of power, representation, and agency in the world and (2) critically interrogate digital media and technologies themselves. Current framings of CDL can be traced back to the sociocultural “turn” in literacy studies, the politically engaged critical literacy movements of the 1970s, and a more recent interest in understanding how language, literacy, and power are mediated through digital technologies. While some critiques of CDL have been grounded in historical resistance to critical literacy more broadly, others focus on issues related to access to digital media and technologies themselves. In response, CDL scholars have offered models of practice that take into account the practical concerns of teachers in classrooms, while retaining a philosophical commitment to rendering visible the ideological dimensions of digital technology. Following the precedents set by scholars of the New Literacy Studies, current research in CDL has focused less on a standardization of definitions and principles, and more on everyday relations, especially in terms of how educators and students realize the production and consumption of digitally literate critical practices in their own contexts.
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    Framing the Portraits of Singapore Secondary Mathematics Pedagogy: An Outsider’s Perspective
    Seah, WT ; Kaur, B ; Yew Hoong, L (Springer Singapore, 2021)
    Thirteen different research articles which report on a programmatic research on the enacted secondary school mathematics curriculum in Singapore have been perused in the preparation for this chapter. It considers the instructional practices associated with Singapore secondary mathematics teachers, and identifies possible contextual factors that facilitate these teachers’ enactment of the mathematics curriculum, framed by the Social Cognitive Theory. These factors include teachers’ content knowledge, trust in the leadership, students as disciples, societal valuing of excellence, and twenty-first century competency education. The role of teacher self-efficacy is also examined. An understanding of these contextual factors helps to frame the portraits of mathematics teaching and learning in Singapore secondary schools, and could also allow us to better assess how best to replicate particular instructional practices in other mathematics education systems. In particular, it appears that what works in practice reflects the harmonious interaction between teacher professionalism on the one hand, and policy and other contextual factors on the other hand, underlied by what individuals, institutions, and the society value now and over time.
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    Mathematical Competencies of Chinese Students: An International Perspective
    Stacey, K ; Xu, B ; Zhu, Y ; Lu, X (SPRINGER INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING AG, 2021-01-01)
    This chapter identifies aspects of the study of mathematical competencies of Chinese students that are likely to be of special interest to international readers. Perhaps the most striking feature is the scale of the work. Within an overarching framework for conceptualizing mathematical competencies, there are detailed reviews of the treatment of each of these cognitive and non-cognitive competencies in the Chinese curriculum since 1902, and a comprehensive set of snapshots of the current performance of Grade 8 students on each. The assessment tools provide powerful base-line data for monitoring students’ mathematical competencies into the future. The detail in the studies will assist international researchers to more deeply understand some of the paradoxes in PISA results, such as Chinese students reporting low classroom exposure to “applied problems” while also demonstrating outstanding performance on items emphasizing PISA’s formulate process. The book gives insight into the strong Chinese tradition of mathematics education, changing over time in response to dramatic social and economic forces but retaining unique features and also becoming increasingly well integrated with international thought.