Faculty of Education - Research Publications

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    Applying empirical learning progressions for a holistic approach to evidence-based education: SWANS/ABLES
    White, E (Australian Council for Educational Research, 2021-08)
    Learning progressions have become an increasing topic of interest for researchers, educational organisations and schools as they can describe the expected pathway of learning within a content area to allow for targeted teaching and learning at all levels of ability. However, there is substantial variation in how learning progressions are developed and to what extent teachers can use them to inform their practices. The ABLES/SWANS tools (Students with Additional Needs/Abilities Based Learning and Education Support) are an example of how an empirical learning progression can be applied to support teachers’ ability to not only target teaching to a student’s zone of proximal development (Vygotsky, 1978), but also to plan, assess, and report on learning. Across Australia, these tools are used to help of thousands of teachers of students with disability to make evidence-based teaching and learning decisions and demonstrate the impact of their work with students. This approach, which scaffolds student achievement towards goals informed by an empirical learning progression, combined with reflective teaching practices, can help teachers to develop their capacity as professionals and provide the most effective teaching and learning for every student, regardless of the presence of disability or additional learning need.
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    Teaching Music with ICT in Australia during COVID and beyond: A preliminary investigation
    Merrick, B ; Joseph, D (Australian Society for Music Education (ASME), 2021)
    While the pandemic COVID-19 has impacted our daily lives, it has also impacted education settings across the globe. Since March 2020, workplaces and classrooms in Australia have undergone significant changes due to ongoing lockdowns, and government restrictions regarding returning to sites of teaching and learning. In this paper we report on some initial findings from our ethically approved study Re-imagining the future: Music teaching and learning, and ICT in blended environments in Australia. The study investigates the move to remote (online) learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this research we explore the types of pedagogies music teachers used in blended teaching and learning environments, and the shift towards ICT during 2020 and in 2021. By employing a mixed method approach an anonymous Qualtrics online survey was employed in which teachers were asked to reflect on their experiences and indicate the various technologies, environments, and strategies for teaching and developing wellbeing that were used during this time. Purposive sampling was used to collect data from music educators in Australia. Key Australian professional music associations were approached to participate in the study who consented for their membership to participate. As part of an ongoing study, we only present preliminary data gathered between March–June 2021. Using thematic analysis, we discuss emerging trends and themes in relation to the many and varied ways that music teachers employed ICT through blended modes. We report on initial findings that unpack some of the music teaching described across learning environments and contexts. Teachers’ use of various software, tools, and innovative pedagogies necessitated by the pandemic add to the body of knowledge, highlighting how the pandemic impacted ‘music(k)ing and the need to use blended teaching. The study also revealed some of the experiences that have altered and reshaped approaches to music teaching. Implications for further research and considerations for teacher training will be discussed. As the pandemic continues, further research will play a significant role in influencing shifts in teaching practice across Australia during COVID-19 and beyond.
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    An investigation of creative music pedagogies used in a Graduate Music Teaching program during COVID-19.
    Merrick, B ; de Bruin, L ; Morijiri, Y ; Imada, T ; Ogawa, Y (APSMER, 2021-09-18)
    This presentation is based on a research project that employed a qualitative methodology to examine students’ responses via an online survey. It looks to consider the benefits and challenges of enacting creative pedagogical approaches in the tertiary context and examine emerging educational practices with regard to twenty-first century learning and technology. Underpinning this research was the intention of exploring how creativity practices were employed to realise twenty-first century capacities, incorporating technology that looked to provide deeper and more profound learning experiences, while developing self-reflection reflection, growth and sustainability. The project will examine which type of teaching methods, content delivery, and online learning found addressed their needs in a creative (unique) way as they used Canvas and Zoom for their lessons across many subjects. This report explores the delivery of a tertiary degree in Music Teaching, specifically addressing the following areas: • Curriculum design, delivery and assessment, • Entrepreneurial approaches to learning through student centred activity, • Online learning, student access, self-regulation and self-assessment, • Learning environments (including online and technology-based practice) that mirror global change, capacities and expectations. Using a qualitative methodology, students were invited to complete a series of items that consisted of open-ended questions. These asked participants to indicate the teaching and learning activities and delivery modes they had found to be the most suitable for them as part of their study in Music Teaching degree program. Data were analysed thematically to derive an understanding of the learning experiences that they found most useful. This presentation will provide an overview of the emerging findings related to the key areas of the study, along with small examples of activities that were used in classes and were found to be valuable for the students during this time. It will highlight the need to be both responsive and adaptive with the use of technologies when teaching in an online environment, considering the ongoing needs students, organisation of resources, as well as purposeful teaching and learning experiences. Although much of the data is specific to the COVID-19 scenario, the recommendations provided are applicable more broadly to teaching in various contexts and will assist all teachers. Importantly, these can be considered more broadly for application in music education across the different learning experiences, i.e., performance, composition, musicology and aural.
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    Tracking creativity in Arts and Music: A document analysis of national educational goals and curriculum in Victoria
    King, F ; Aguilar, CE ; Poblete Lagos, C ; Prest, A ; Richerme, LK (International Society of Music Education (ISME), 2020)
    An analysis of national educational goals and curriculum documents played an important role in my doctoral study in Victoria, Australia. The study was a mixed methods investigation into teaching for creativity and creative processes for music educators in primary schools. The analysis aimed to explore the place of creativity from an educational goal and curriculum perspective. Documents from a forty-year period were investigated qualitatively to seek the portrayal and contextual meanings of the word “creativity”. The paper is presented in two parts: the influence of three national declarations of educational goals on the changing place of creativity in contemporaneous curriculum, and creativity as communicated to teachers in curriculum documents in Arts and Music. The purpose of the document analysis was to gain a detailed view of creativity within the two specifically selected document types. In doing so, it informed the development of the survey instrument of the study and was distilled to form an adjunct to the literature review. The document analysis showed variation and similarity between historic and recent contexts of creativity in Arts and Music curriculum. The place of creativity in the Music curriculum in Victoria shows a sense of continuity through different iterations of curriculum. Yet, despite this, there are clear shifts in the language that describes or implies creativity in Arts and Music curriculum. Ultimately, the document analysis presented a glocalised and historic perspective of educational goals and curriculum in Victoria and has the capacity to inform future research and teacher practice in creativity and education.
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    Using interviews with non-examples to assess reasoning in F-2 classrooms
    Copping, K ; Leong, YH ; Kaur, B ; Choy, BH ; Yeo, JBW ; Chin, SL (Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia (MERGA), 2021)
    The development of mathematical reasoning is a key proficiency for mathematics within the Australian Curriculum. However, reasoning can be difficult for teachers to assess, particularly with pen and paper tests. In this study, interview tasks were designed across three curriculum areas at three different levels to assess student reasoning through the use of examples and non-examples. Non-examples can be used to assist in building boundaries and deepening conceptual understanding. Through the interview, teacher and student dialogue can help students to demonstrate reasoning and clarify concepts through explanation and justification.
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    A model of student mathematical wellbeing: Australian Grade 8 students’ conceptions
    Hill, JL ; Kern, ML ; Seah, WT ; van Driel, J ; Inprasitha, M ; Changsri, N ; Boonsena, N (Psychology of Mathematics Education, 2020)
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    An Ethical Dilemma Inspiring Exploration into Netnography
    Rochette, E (Deakin University, Melbourne, 2021)
    This presentation seeks to explore a methodology new to the author and possibly of interest to conference attendees who are seeking to conduct research in the online space. The focus will be on netnography as a methodology and the ethical implications of conducting research over social media. The COVID-19 pandemic has brought challenges to students completing short-term research subjects. Some may be inspired to turn to social media to conduct research perceived to be straightforward to implement while avoiding the ethical pitfalls that often accompany doing face-to-face research with humans. This presentation seeks to tell the story of an ethical dilemma that sparked exploration into netnography, a methodological approach seeking to ‘understand the cultural experiences that encompass and are reflected within the traces, practices, networks and systems of social media’ (Kozinets, 2020, p.14). The presentation aims to engage the audience in conversation about doing research in the online space by exploring the similarities and differences between netnography and other approaches applied in the online context. At the same time, the presentation will explain the ethical practices enabling netnographic research to be conducted over social media through collection, participation in and interpretation of online traces.
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    To what extent does a subject-related degree offer security for secondary science teachers managing the use of digital technologies as they teach out-of-field?
    Rochette, E (OOF-TAS Collective, 2021-09-13)
    In Australia, general science teachers have duties to teach students across four sub-disciplines of science while incorporating digital technologies into their practice. At the Seventh International OOF-TAS Symposium in 2020, a positioning theory (Harré & van Langenhove, 1999) analysis of data from secondary science teachers was presented to demonstrate how teachers negotiate their rights and duties teaching across two out-of-field areas of the curriculum, geoscience and digital technologies. Conversations stemming from this symposium and the resulting book chapter inspired further questions to be unpacked. This chapter exemplifies data from four secondary science teachers with distinct subject-related experience and at different career stages to explore the question: To what extent does a subject-related professional history offer security for teachers managing the use of digital technologies as they teach out-of-field? Data analyses along the positioning triad demonstrate how recommendations for school administrators and leaders are grounded in teachers’ perceptions of their lived experience. These recommendations are discussed in relation to the importance of crafting differentiated professional learning experiences to build teachers’ personal and professional capacity in out-of-field areas.
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    ‘Mixed-tape Methods’ for Data in Post-digital Times of Disease
    Coleman, K ; Spreadborough, K ; Belton, A ; Cochrane, T (Technology Knowledge & Society Research Network, 2021-04-08)
    In 2020, our teaching and research moved almost exclusively online. Zoom was a must have tool for communication. The shift online has impacted our academic, research, and teaching practices. But can the data traces generated by this shift be leveraged to understand and enhance how we work in and for education? We propose that, as knowledge makers, relational feedback loops and ‘mixed-tape methods’ can create new ways for do-ing, be-ing and know-ing from one data site to another. Doing research during a time of disruption using an iterative approach allows us to adapt the methods as our work and life circumstances changed in response to the pandemic, throughout the uncertainties of life in lockdown we collaboratively co-designed our work. The work of co-designing feedback loops in partnership highlight how the digital enables experience and engagement that generates new experiences and engagements, enabling us to establish new ways of exploring new possibilities with/in. The uncertain unknowns of a covid-normal arts sector means that co-designed arts education gives some solid ground for teachers and learners to create and navigate their future paths. We will present and perform the effects of these experiences and engagements on artists and the arts community in a pandemic and explore the affects of these experiences and engagements for education. We acknowledge that we live and work on the lands of the Wurundjeri people that hold stories across time and space. #Datacreativities is a co-lab of interdisciplinary digital research cross faculty partnership, we examine #datacreative using feedback loops.
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    Prototyping a transdisciplinary bioengineering curriculum development project
    Lam, L ; Cochrane, T ; Davey, C ; John, S ; Shaktivesh, S ; Ganesan, S ; Rajagopal, V (ASCILITE, 2021-11-29)
    Building students’ capabilities to integrate complex concepts across transdisciplinary boundaries of related but distinct theoretical courses is critical to real-world problem solving and creative design solutions (Burnett, 2011). In the context of bioengineering, students must be able to draw on knowledge from several scientific and mathematical domains and integrate them in innovative ways to tackle complex biomedical problems. In traditional degree structures, these domains are typically sequestered into distinct subjects, with minimal cross-curricular references beyond the acknowledgement of any chains of prerequisite knowledge. This has had the unintended effect of students over-compartmentalising concepts: they are often unable to appreciate how different ideas fit together synergistically to form a coherent and more complex whole. To address this problem, we initiated a curriculum design project exploring the development of an integrative and collaborative student project that authentically links four theoretical foundations of bioengineering across multiple years of a degree program: programming and systems modelling concepts, human anatomy and biomechanics, electronics, and engineering design. A design-based research (DBR) methodology was applied to establish a curriculum design team encompassing academic lecturers, educational technology researchers, and technology designers. Our curriculum design process follows a four-stage iterative model comprising of: problem analysis and identification of initial design principles, prototyping curriculum design solutions, evaluation and redesign, followed by refinement and sharing of the design principles. The current iteration of the curriculum development project involves a 3D-printed programmable robotic arm and a series of constructively aligned workshop activities and assessments, and there are plans to establish a common learner-centric ecology of resources (Luckin, 2008) for student collaborative projects across the subjects, including the use of ePortfolios and team collaboration software such as MS Teams. This poster outlines the first two DBR stages, involving the design principles and prototype development.