Melbourne Graduate School of Education - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 96
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Student inclination to work with unfamiliar challenging problems: The role of resilience
    WILLIAMS, G (The Mathematical Association of Victoria, 2003)
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Teacher Research can Enrich Teaching Practice: An Example
    WILLIAMS, G ; CAVALLIN, N (The Mathematical Association of Victoria, 2004)
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Teaching and Learning in the Middle Years of Schooling: Having Faith in Students
    TADICH, B ; WILLIAMS, G (The Mathematical Association of Victoria, 2004)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    The Nature of Spontaneity in High Quality Learning Situations
    WILLIAMS, G (Bergen University College, 2004)
    Spontaneity has been linked to high quality learning experiences in mathematics (Csikszentmihalyi & Csikszentmihalyi, 1992; Williams, 2002).This paper shows how spontaneity can be identified by attending to the nature of social elements in the process of abstracting (Dreyfus, Hershkowitz, & Schwarz, 2001). This process is elaborated through an illustrative example—a Year 8 Australian male student who scaffolded his learning by attending to images in the classroom that were intended for other purposes. Leon’s cognitive processing was not ‘observable’ (Dreyfus et al., 2001) in classroom dialogue because Leon ‘thought alone’. Post-lesson videostimulated reconstructive interviews facilitated study of Leon’s thought processes and extended methodological techniques available to study thinking in classrooms..
  • Item
    No Preview Available
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Organizing for Multilingualism: Ecological and Sociological Perspectives
    LO BIANCO, J (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages, 2008)
  • Item
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Transnational education: our expectations and our challenges. Is anyone listening? From teachers’ and students’ perspectives
    MOHAMAD, ROHANI ; Rashdan, Muhammad ; Rashid, Abdul ( 2006)
    In the 70’s and early 80’s, many Malaysian students went to the West to further their tertiary education. They completed their undergraduate program from year one in the respective foreign countries. In the late 80’s, there was a shift in trend. More students conducted their initial years in Malaysia before finishing off their final years in the West. Multiple twinning programs that utilize foreign curriculum but implemented in Malaysian environment are offered at various private educational institutions. In the light of this phenomenon, trans-national education or cross-border education is not novel within the Malaysian educational landscape. This paper is a reflection of the author who had experienced trans-national education as a student and currently experiencing it as a teacher. We ponder upon the nature of experiences that students involved in trans-education encounter that potentially modify their learning behaviors. As for the students, we conclude that they generally experience three types of shocks that are cultural shock, learning shock, and assessment shock. Observations made on the challenges faced by the students to adapt to the demands of the curriculum, novel strategies of teaching and learning as well as requirements of assessments are reported. Finally, we proposed some steps that could be taken to reduce the impact of multiple shocks and enhance learning in trans-national program.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Misconceptions about density of decimals: insights from pre-service teachers’ work
    Widjaja, Wanty ; STACEY, KAYE ; STEINLE, VICKI ( 2008)
    Extensive studies have documented various difficulties with, and misconceptions about, decimal numeration across different levels of education. This paper reports on pre-service teachers’ misconceptions about the density of decimals. Written test data from 140 pre-service teachers, observation of group and classroom discussions provided evidence of pre-service teachers’ difficulties in grasping the density notion of decimals. Incorrect analogies resulting from over generalization of knowledge about whole numbers and fractions were identified. Teaching ideas to resolve these difficulties are discussed. Evidence from this research indicates that it is possible to remove misconceptions about density of decimals.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Global challenges for land administration and sustainable development
    Williamson, I. P. ( 2006)
    An important government activity of all nation states is building and maintaining a land administration system (LAS) with the primary objective of supporting an efficient and effective land market. This includes cadastral surveys to identify and subdivide land, land registry systems to support simple land trading (buying, selling, mortgaging and leasing land) and land information systems to facilitate access to the relevant information, increasingly through an Internet enabled e-government environment. For most countries a cadastre is at the core of the LAS providing spatial integrity and unique land parcel identification in support of security of tenure and effective land trading. For many cadastral and land administration officials and for much of society, these are the primary, and in many cases the only roles of the cadastre and LAS. However the role, and particularly the potential of LAS and their core cadastres, have rapidly expanded over the last couple of decades and will continue to change in the future. But what is a land market in a modern economy? Since our LAS were developed, land commodities and trading patterns have undergone substantial changes: they have become complex, corporatised and international. Are our current LAS designed to support a modern land market that trades in complex commodities such as mortgage backed certificates, water rights, land information, time shares, unit and property trusts, resource rights, financial instruments, insurance products, options, corporate development instruments and vertical villages? Modern land markets involve a complex and dynamic range of activities, processes and opportunities, and are impacted upon by a wide range of restrictions and responsibilities imposed on land especially since WW II. These restrictions are continually evolving, primarily in response to economic, energy and sustainable development objectives. They are equally being driven by developments in information and communications techn