Melbourne Graduate School of Education - Research Publications

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    (Re)imagining ambivalent Australia: the curriculum as a tool of nation
    Bacalja, A ; Bliss, L ; Bulfer, M (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2021-07-17)
    This paper explores how Australian literature mandated for study in the Victorian senior English curriculum creates opportunities for problematizing central myths about Australia. We engage with Homi Bhabha’s notion of ambivalence to demonstrate how representations of colonization, rurality and migration reflect discursive formations of Australia. We consider how each discourse serves a pedagogic function, essentializing a set of myths about Australia: as having redeemed the violence done to Indigenous Australians in the colonial period, as embodying a white, rural masculine ideal, and as a welcoming nation open to migrants. Here, we show the points of orientation these texts provide, in their rearticulations of “the scraps … of daily life”, and further consider how the texts can problematize nationalist narratives.
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    (Re)orientating literacy doxa in the digital age: the discursive practices of new policy actors
    Bacalja, A (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2021-10-04)
    deological struggles over the policy and practice of literacy education continue to characterise the field. This paper explores how ‘new policy actors’, market-orientated and profit-driven players, construct the crisis of literacy and schooling in Australia to reclaim the doxa of literacy education. The concept of doxa is employed to show how recent discursive practices are contributing to orthodox and heterodox positions. A mixed-methods content analysis was performed on reports produced by business groups and their proxies, analysing how these reports construct new narratives. The findings reveal how these stakeholders adopt a stance best characterised as the old doxa revisited and (re)orientated for new economic imperatives. A defence of literacy as ‘common-sense’ basic skills, in crisis, and predominantly developed through schooling for the purpose of work, is supplemented with a discourse which updates literacy doxa to include technological (media) dimensions where digital literacy skills are the ‘new basics’ of literacy education.
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    Mothers as First Teachers: Exploring the Features of Motherchild Interactions That Support Young Aboriginal Children’s Multilingual Learning at Playgroup
    Scull, J ; Page, J ; Lee, WY ; Murray, L ; Gapany, D ; Stewart, S ; Murukun, M ; Scannell, N ; Lawrence, R ; Dhurrkay, J ; Hayes, F ; Burarrwanga, V ; Chynoweth, L ; Callahan, M ; Goveas, JN ; Cock, ML ; Mentha, S ; Eadie, P ; Sparling, J (Deakin University, 2021-11-30)
    For many Indigenous children living in remote communities, the prerequisites to achieving strong language and learning outcomes include the maintenance of their first languages and progress in learning English as an additional language. This paper reports on data from a Linkage study conducted with families at two Families as First Teachers (FaFT) playgroups in two remote Northern Territory communities. The data highlight the ways parents and carers encouraged very young children to engage in home languages as a foundation on which to develop skills in English during play and book reading activities. Transcripts of mother-child book reading and play sessions and reflections of FaFT Family Liaison Officers are examined to explore the language interactions and the strategies used by mothers to support children’s multilingual learning. The data highlight the importance of early childhood teaching and learning that honours children’s linguistic and cultural resources and prioritises families’ aspirations for children’s multilingual language learning.
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    Leveraging Languages for Learning: Incorporating Plurilingual Pedagogies in Early Childhood Education and Care
    Cohrssen, C ; Slaughter, Y ; Nicolas, E (Deakin University, 2021-11-30)
    Abstract: Children are members of families and communities, and the languages learnt within these contexts contribute to a child’s sense of “belonging, being and becoming” throughout life (Department of Education Employment and Workplace Relations, 2009). Encouraging children to bring their home languages into early childhood education and care (ECEC) settings exposes all children to additional languages and supports key outcomes of the Early Years Learning Framework for Australia (EYLF; DEEWR, 2009). This article looks at the relationship between key tenets of the EYLF and conditions that support a plurilingual approach within ECEC settings, arguing that multilingualism can be encouraged and effectively supported within these environments. The authors outline Bronfenbrenner’s bioecological theory of development which continues to be influential in Australian ECEC, emphasizing the importance of proximal processes in child development. Examples are provided of educator behaviours set out in the EYLF that encourage linguistic diversity and promote language learning. The influence of three key variables on the valuing of languages is discussed, namely language ideologies, teacher beliefs and attitudes, and plurilingual pedagogies. Recommendations relating to the positive positioning of languages and the integration of plurilingual pedagogies into Australian ECEC contexts are provided.
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    Editorial: Languages in Early Childhood Education
    Slaughter, Y ; Keary, A ; Gillian, P ; Bonar, G (Deakin University, 2021-11-30)
    In the context of ever-changing global movement of peoples in and between countries, linguistic diversity, and diversity in modes of communication and expression have become increasingly vibrant and visible (D’warte & Slaughter, 2021). These changes have also been reflected in research scholarship into languages acquisition where monolingual-centric assumptions have been disrupted by heteroglossic perspectives that view the linguistic repertoire of any individual, including the very young child, as complex – shaped by the “linguistic, cognitive, social and emotional” characteristics of the individual (Seltzer & García, 2020, p. 2). In orienting this to the classroom, Cummins & Early (2011) argue that the relationship between language and identity cannot be untwined but that indeed, a critical precondition for learning involves recognising and engaging with the cultural and linguistic knowledges and learning experiences of students.
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    Collaborative team approaches to supporting inclusion of children with disability in mainstream schools: A co-design study
    Garcia-Melgar, A ; Hyett, N ; Bagley, K ; McKinstry, C ; Spong, J ; Iacono, T (PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, 2022-07-01)
    BACKGROUND: Collaborative consultation involving educational staff, allied health professionals and parents working towards goals for children with disability is considered best practice in inclusive education. However, challenges can hinder effective collaboration, thereby potentially limiting child outcomes. AIMS: The study aims were to (a) explore the experiences of teachers, teacher assistants, allied health professionals, and parents engaging in collaborative teamwork to support inclusion of children with disability in mainstream primary schools, and (b) identify key factors influencing effective teamwork and the design of support strategies. METHODS AND PROCEDURES: A co-design research method emulated collaborative consultation and authentic stakeholder teamwork. Data were from a series of six co-design workshops (15 h); discussions were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. An interpretive descriptive method of thematic analysis resulted in four key themes. OUTCOMES AND RESULTS: Critical factors that influenced collaborative teamwork were access to diagnosis and funding, mechanisms for team communications, practical ways of working together, and shared understandings of inclusion. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Stakeholder teams require effective communication mechanisms and practical ways of working together within and outside of classrooms. Shared understandings of inclusion provide a foundation for collaboration, requiring access to professional development to ensure teamwork is informed by best inclusive education practice.
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    Investing in a better future: higher education and post-COVID Canada
    Brennan, J ; Deer, F ; Trilokekar, RD ; Findlay, L ; Foster, K ; Laforest, G ; Wheelahan, L ; Wright, JM ; Blais, JM (CANADIAN SCIENCE PUBLISHING, 2021-06-03)
    Post-secondary education (PSE) is a vital part of civil society and any modern economy. When broadly accessible, it can enable socioeconomic mobility, improve health outcomes, advance social cohesion, and support a highly skilled workforce. It yields public benefits not only in improved well-being and economic prosperity, but also in reduced costs in health care and social services. Canada also relies heavily on the PSE sector for research. During the COVID-19 pandemic, PSE has supported research related to the pandemic response and other critical areas, including providing expert advice to support public health and government decision-making, while maintaining educational programs and continuing to contribute to local and regional economies. But the pandemic effort has stretched already strained PSE resources and people even further: for decades, declining public investment has driven increases in tuition and decreases in faculty complement, undermining Canada’s research capacity and increasing student debt as well as destabilizing the sector through a growing reliance on volatile international education markets. Given the challenges before us, including climate change, reconciliation, and the pandemic, it is imperative that we better draw on the full range of experience, knowledge, and creativity in Canada and beyond through an inclusive, stable, and globally engaged PSE. Supporting PSE’s recovery will be key to Canada’s ongoing pandemic response and recovery. The recommendations in this report are guided by a single goal—to make the post-secondary sector a more effective partner and support in building a more equitable, sustainable, and evidence-driven future for Canada, through and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.
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    Authorship practices in educational technology research
    Thompson, K ; Corrin, L ; Lodge, JM ; Hwang, G-J (Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education, 2022-04-14)
    Authoring documents and academic articles is a key means by which researchers share new knowledge and is closely tied to academic progression, prestige for individuals and institutions, and continued funding of research. In this editorial we continue our discussion around ensuring quality research and publication practices, with a focus on authorship. There are concerning trends emerging around practices in relation to authorship across the publishing landscape. In the field of educational technology research, projects can involve teams of people in a variety of roles. This can result in a particular risk, that important contributions of learning designers and technologists are overlooked, despite their involvement in the creation of the tools tested, or the infrastructure with which we collect data. In this editorial we will consider the importance of authorship, explore the common issues related to how authorship is determined and represented, and relate the debate currently in play across different disciplines around authorship to our context of educational technology research. We will conclude by introducing our revised guidelines for authorship at AJET.
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    Chinese, Japanese and Korean-inspired culinary words in the English language
    Kiaer, J ; Calway, N ; Ahn, H (Penerbit Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM Press), 2021-01-01)
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    The Digital Sabbath and the Digital Distraction: Arts-Based Research Methods for New Audiences
    Paris, LF ; Morris, JE ; Bailey, J (Nova Southeastern University, 2022-02-01)
    Despite the known affordances of Arts-Based Research Practice within the international education environment, its use remains relatively uncommon in Western Australia. The reasons for this are likely the contested nature of quality criteria by which Arts-Based Practice is evaluated as well as the challenges as well associated with the dissemination of research findings. Mixed-methods research is increasingly recognised as an appropriate and practical approach for education phenomena, and within this domain, inquiry that combines traditional qualitative and arts-based strategies offers the education researcher advantages that are not readily available through other approaches. As professional artists and researchers we share our experiences in employing our visual arts specialism within a qualitative approach. Our focus for inquiry was a “Digital Sabbath” intervention (a practice of regularly unplugging from all technology/devices with the aim of increasing social connectedness and mitigating stress) with seven early career visual arts teachers whose voices and experience of the digital disruption might otherwise have remained silenced. The importance of the study was both that we trialed a well-being intervention, but also that we innovated our methodological research repertoire by combining traditional and contemporary elements of the Qualitative paradigm.