Melbourne Graduate School of Education - Research Publications

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    Restoration Playbooks and Receivers’ Stamps: James Magnes, Richard Bentley, and ‘the Post-Office in Russel-street in Covent-Garden’
    Koch, E ; McInnis, D (Taylor and Francis Group, 2024)
    This article examines the surprisingly prevalent incidence of contemporary handstamps impressed upon the final leaf of Restoration playbooks. These are all circular and contain either individual letters or are bisected and contain a combination of letters and numerals. As they are demonstrably not part of the printing process, they have not attracted the attention of textual editors; but as this article shows, neither are they markers of ownership that would interest scholars researching provenance. We identify the marks as being the stamps of letter receivers; in particular, receivers (James Magnes and Richard Bentley) who were also stationers involved in the publishing of the plays we examined. The presence of these stamps suggests that Magnes and Bentley served not only as publishers and booksellers, but as distributors of the playbooks they produced. The presence of these stamps thus has implications for the distribution of Restoration playbooks through the English postal system.
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    Adolescent School Belonging and Mental Health Outcomes in Young Adulthood: Findings from a Multi-wave Prospective Cohort Study
    Allen, K-A ; Greenwood, CJ ; Berger, E ; Patlamazoglou, L ; Reupert, A ; Wurf, G ; May, F ; O'Connor, M ; Sanson, A ; Olsson, CA ; Letcher, P (SPRINGER, 2024-01-01)
    Abstract School belonging, sometimes referred to as school belonging or school connectedness, involves dimensions like positive affect towards school, relationships with teachers, and feeling socially valued. Previous research points to immediate benefits for students’ mental health and wellbeing; however, evidence on the potential long-term benefits of school belonging for mental health—once young people leave the school setting—is limited. This study used data on 1568 adults from the Australian Temperament Project (ATP), a 16-wave longitudinal study which has tracked participants since infancy. The short form of the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) School Life Questionnaire was used to assess secondary school belonging at age 15–16 years whilst young adult mental health symptoms were evaluated using the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS-21) at 19–20, 23–24, and 27–28 years. Generalised Estimating Equation models were used to examine the link between secondary school belonging and mental health symptoms in young adulthood. Results showed that higher levels of all aspects of school belonging were associated with lower mental health symptoms across young adulthood (β range − 0.05 to − 0.20). Associations were similar by gender. These findings underscore the importance of adolescent school belonging and in particular school status in reference to feeling socially valued, as a long-term protective factor that can mitigate against later depression, anxiety, and stress.
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    How Young Italians Negotiate and Redefine their Identity in the Mobility Experience
    Giardiello, M ; Cuervo, H ; Capobianco, R (MDPI AG, 2024)
    In this article we analyze the formation of different identity models of Italian young people experiencing mobility. The article contributes to study the link between youth mobility and identity. It does so through the development of a theoretical perspective that combines Butler’s post-structuralism with Bourdieu’s category of embodied cultural capital. Drawing on this theoretical framework, we analyze the identity formation of young Italians who emigrated to Australia in the last 10 years. The data show the emergence of an identity made up of a complex set of interconnected levels, composed of an incorporated dimension that constitutes the basis of their roots and the performative part that represents the mobile dimension subject to transformation in the course of life evolution. This interpretative lens enables the understanding of how the process of incorporation is connected to the performative and self-transformative one of identity, but also how the different combination of fixed and mobile aspects defines different profiles of identity and a different way of perceiving being Italians.
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    Designing Game-Centred Curricula: A Critical Inquiry
    Bacalja, A ; Nash, B ; Clutton, M ; De Kruiff, J ; White, B (James York, 2024)
    Background: Digital games as technologies for teaching and learning are finding their way into schools with increasing frequency, raising questions about how teachers plan for their use. Aim: This paper utilises curriculum inquiry to explore the experiences of teachers designing curricula that centre digital games for play and study. Methods: We employ a memory work methodology to analyse four English teachers’ reflections, emphasizing the value of reflecting on everyday actions to understand the complexity of professional lives and the situated nature of knowledge. Results: Our paper reveals that designing and implementing digital game-centred curricula is complex. The analysis of themes related to engaging with students’ lifeworlds, planning for skills and knowledge, the challenges of play, and issues of access and equity, suggest use of technology for school learning is always inseparable from other phenomena, such as teaching methods, purposes, values and contexts. Conclusion: Those engaged in the design of game-centred curricula are in a constant state of negotiation which neither starts nor ends with the production of material artefacts.
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    Co-designing a curriculum model for career education: perspectives from regional communities in Australia
    Mahat, M ; Dollinger, M ; D'Angelo, B ; Naylor, R ; Harvey, A (SPRINGER, 2023-04)
    The vocational experiences and skills of young adolescents could be infused into formal education by identifying career competencies to be taught within the academic curriculum. Such curriculum practices that embed educational and career pathways must also include the perspectives of students and the community, particularly those from marginalised groups. Drawing on data from 111 teachers, principals, carers and students, this paper presents research undertaken to co-design career education lesson plans within an infused model of the curriculum for early Middle Year students from regional, rural, and remote Australia. The lesson plans and activities were designed to allow for meaningful self-reflection and goal-setting that could be seamlessly infused into the formal curriculum and help embed early-stage career education. The paper concludes by projecting opportunities and challenges for seamless curriculum integration, while pertinent to the Australian context, can also be read with broader relevance to other educational systems and schools.
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    Editorial foreword: Challenging academic participation
    Nielsen, A-KS ; Hendry, NA ; Uldbjerg, S (Walter de Gruyter GmbH, 2023-10-01)
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    Let me tell you, I see echolalia as being a part of my son's identity': Exploring echolalia as an expression of neurodiversity from a parental perspective
    Cohn, E ; Harrison, M ; Mcvilly, K (SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2023-09-06)
    Echolalia is a commonly found speech and language condition in autistic children. Children with echolalia repeat words and phrases they previously hear in place of proving a non-repetitive response. In research and when visiting speech and language services, one of the common goals is to modify these repetitions so that these children may, more socially, engage with their surrounding environment. In our research, we identified that not all parents want their children's echolalia to be modified. Some parents want their child to be able to enjoy echolalia and others don't want anyone to intervene because they see it as something that makes their child unique and being unique is something to be celebrated. We believe that there might be a way for speech and language services who want to modify echolalia and the parents in our study who do not want their child's echolalia to be modified, to be able to exist side-by-side.
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    Programming for older children in School Age Care: Adult and child engagement with developmental pedagogies
    Hurst, B (SAGE Publications, 2023-01-01)
    How to work with older children has been ongoing question in Australian School Age Care (SAC) for over 30 years. Children aged 10–12 years are often spoken of as a problematic Other whose pose a risk to the younger children who attend SAC in higher proportions. This article aims to address the gap in research about what practices might work with this age group. It draws on a qualitative study conducted with SAC practitioners and older children who attend SAC. In semi-structured interviews, practitioners were asked about what strategies they employed with older children. These strategies are then viewed in relation to the perspectives of older children who were consulted via participatory methods and ethnography about what good SAC might look like. The research explores two approaches that draw on developmental knowledges, the use of separate spaces and resources, and a role called apprentice educator. Whilst older children appear to value strategies like age-segregated spaces and resources, they are less likely to take up adult-like, apprentice educator roles curated for them by practitioners. Older children’s responses to these strategies can be understood as powerful acts around developmental discourses that construct and reconstruct the category of older child in SAC.
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    Engaging and developing community in digital spaces: Approaches from the Editorial Development Group
    Karamercan, O ; Matapo, J ; Kamenarac, O ; Fa'avae, DTM ; Arndt, S ; Irwin, R ; Kruger, F ; Mika, C ; Bassidou, MYA ; Tesar, M ; Del Monte, P (TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2023-06-07)
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    Exploring mobile mixed reality for critical thinking in nursing and healthcare education: A systematic review
    Stretton, T ; Cochrane, T ; Sevigny, C ; Rathner, J (CHURCHILL LIVINGSTONE, 2024-02)
    BACKGROUND: The shortage of nursing and healthcare clinical placements has prompted the investigation of ways to supplement authentic learning. Mobile mixed reality has become increasingly available, however, the affordances and design principles for the facilitation of critical thinking are yet to be explored. OBJECTIVE: To examine how mobile mixed reality facilitates critical thinking in nursing and healthcare higher education. DESIGN: Systematic review. REVIEW METHODS: A search in seven databases (MEDLINE, PsychINFO, AMED, ERIC, Scopus, Cochrane, and Web of Science) was conducted with 3488 titles and abstracts screened. The quality of the included studies was evaluated using the Mixed Methods Assessment Tool (MMAT). RESULTS: A total of 12 studies with 1108 participants were included. The breadth of healthcare disciplines was limited to five disciplines that utilised bespoke scenarios on head-mounted displays. Most scenarios were emergency or critical response, with limited time for pre-brief, debrief, or overall user time. Only two studies directly measured critical thinking, with others including indirect reference to diagnoses, interpretation, analysis, or evaluation of healthcare scenarios. Affordances and design principles for the future development of mobile mixed reality for critical thinking in nursing and healthcare higher education are identified. CONCLUSIONS: While some pedagogical affordances of mobile mixed reality can be identified in a narrow number of healthcare disciplines, there remain to be limited valid measures of critical thinking used to quantify effectiveness. Future studies would benefit from considering scenarios beyond emergency and critical responses, including longitudinal studies that reflect the development of critical thinking over time, and exploration of co-designed scenarios with and by nursing and healthcare students.