Melbourne Graduate School of Education - Research Publications

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    Young people and citizenship: An everyday perspective
    Harris, A ; Wyn, J ; Younes, S ( 2007-01-01)
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    Parental Support for African Immigrant Students' Schooling in Australia
    Bitew, G ; Ferguson, P (J COMPARATIVE FAMILY STUDIES, 2010-12-01)
    This article reports upon the involvement of Ethiopian-Australian parents in the education of their children attending secondary schools in Melbourne, Australia. It investigates the parents’ efforts in providing academic support to their children. The study utilized a qualitative methodology, using interviews as a major data collection tool, and employed secondary school students, their teachers and parents as informants for the study. After the transcription and coding of the interview data, thematic analysis was used. The findings indicated that the majority of the students did not receive academic support from their parents due to the parents’ limited educational experience, low socio-economic status and lack of time. Most of the parents had no contact with their children’s school. The majority of the parents had little exposure to the Australian education system. However, the report also highlights that parents give high value to education and that they want their children to attend and succeed not only in secondary school but also go on to further education. The results also show a strong link between the level of parental academic support for their children and their own academic background. Based on the findings of the study, recommendations are also forwarded.
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    Engendering a Therapeutic Ethos: Modernity, Masculinity and Nervousness
    Wright, K (WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC, 2009-03-01)
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    The Talking Cure in Everyday Life: Gender, Generations and Friendship
    McLeod, J ; Wright, K (SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2009-02-01)
    This article examines the insinuation of therapeutic culture into everyday life from the vantage point of a qualitative cross-generational study of economically marginalized young women and their mothers. Against dominant assessments of therapeutic culture — as representing cultural decline, social regulation or transformation — we draw on interview narratives to analyse its practical and situated effects. We argue that desires for disclosure and open communication are not trivial or narcissistic and instead interpret them as productive emotional strategies for managing difficult circumstances, and for engendering a sense of competence and possibility.Thus a concern with`talkingthings through' is neither ineffectual nor adequately understood as a manifestation of an ahistorical feminine alignment with emotions and interior life. While we do not dismiss regulatory aspects of therapeutic culture, our analysis offers an alternative and empirically based account of the ways cultural imperatives are enacted across generations.
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    Beyond apathetic or activist youth 'Ordinary' young people and contemporary forms of participation
    Harris, A ; Wyn, J ; Younes, S (SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2010-02-01)
    This article addresses the changing nature of participation for young people. Our analysis is framed by the fragmentation of traditional institutions and the increasingly unpredictable nature of life trajectories. As a result, the identification of a crisis in young people’s engagement has become a recurrent theme in the literature, alongside a burgeoning interest in new forms of (sub)cultural participatory practices. We argue that there is further complexity in the reshaping of participation in times of social change, especially for a broad ‘mainstream’ of young people who are neither deeply apathetic about politics nor unconventionally engaged. Drawing on a research project with 970 young Australians, the article suggests that many young people are disenchanted with political structures that are unresponsive to their needs and interests, but that they remain interested in social and political issues and continue to seek recognition from the political system. At the same time, their participatory practices are not oriented towards spectacular antistate activism or cultural politics but take the form of informal, individualized and everyday activities.
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    Generation, youth and social change in Australia
    Wyn, J ; Woodman, D (Informa UK Limited, 2006-11-01)
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    Theorizing therapeutic culture Past influences, future directions
    Wright, K (SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2008-12-01)
    Analyses of the influence of psychology and the growth of counselling during the 20th century commonly point to the deleterious effects of a cultural shift from reticence and self-reliance to emotional expressiveness and help-seeking. Indeed, the ascendancy of therapeutic culture has been widely interpreted as fostering cultural decline and enabling new forms of social control. Drawing on less pessimistic assessments of cultural change and recent directions in social theory, this article argues for greater recognition of the ambivalent legacy of the therapeutic turn. Through a reinterpretation of the consequences of the diminution of traditional authority, the weakening of the division between public and private life, and the rise of the confessional, the article challenges dominant readings of decline and control. In doing so, it draws attention to how psychological knowledge and therapeutic understandings of the self have given legitimacy to, and furnished a language with which to articulate, experiences of suffering formerly confined to private life. In advancing a less pessimistic interpretation of cultural change, it considers two historic moments in Australia: the advent of telephone counselling in the 1960s and the Royal Commission on Human Relationships in the 1970s.