Melbourne Graduate School of Education - Research Publications

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Now showing 1 - 10 of 79
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    Hair braiding: Working the boundaries of methodology in globalisation research
    DIXON, MG (Association for Qualitative Research, 2005)
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    Voicing resistance: Adolescent boys and the cultural practice of leisure reading
    Hamston, J ; Love, K (Informa UK Limited, 2005-06-01)
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    Edward Said and the Cultural Politics of Education
    RIZVI, F. ; LINGARD, B. ( 2006)
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    Towards cosmopolitan learning
    RIZVI, F. ( 2009)
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    Teacher Qualifications and Attitudes Toward Inclusion
    Hsien, M ; Brown, P ; Bortoli, A (CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS, 2009-08-01)
    Abstract The inclusion of children with disabilities into the regular education classroom has resulted in many studies on teacher attitudes. Current research has examined teacher beliefs about inclusion, their concerns, and issues pertaining to their ability to cater effectively for children with disabilities in their classrooms. Despite this, there appears to be little research investigating potential associations between teacher attitudes and beliefs toward inclusion, their education levels, and teacher training. This study investigated the attitudes and beliefs of 36 general and special education/early intervention teachers in Victoria. Results of the study show that teachers with higher educational qualifications in special education were more positive about inclusion.
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    Advancements in Research Synthesis Methods: From a Methodologically Inclusive Perspective
    Suri, H ; Clarke, D (SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2009-03-01)
    The dominant literature on research synthesis methods has positivist and neo-positivist origins. In recent years, the landscape of research synthesis methods has changed rapidly to become inclusive. This article highlights methodologically inclusive advancements in research synthesis methods. Attention is drawn to insights from interpretive, critical, and participatory traditions for enhancing trustworthiness, utility, and/or emancipatory potential for research syntheses. Also noted is a paucity of the literature that builds connections between methodologically diverse segments of the literature on research synthesis methods. Salient features of a methodologically inclusive research synthesis (MIRS) framework are described. The MIRS framework has been conceptualized by distilling and synthesizing ideas, theories, and strategies from the extensive literatures on research synthesis methods and primary research methods. Rather than prescribe how a research synthesis should be conducted or evaluated, this article attempts to open spaces, raise questions, explore possibilities, and contest taken-for-granted practices.
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    The power of feedback
    Hattie, J ; Timperley, H (SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2007-03-01)
    Feedback is one of the most powerful influences on learning and achievement, but this impact can be either positive or negative. Its power is frequently mentioned in articles about learning and teaching, but surprisingly few recent studies have systematically investigated its meaning. This article provides a conceptual analysis of feedback and reviews the evidence related to its impact on learning and achievement. This evidence shows that although feedback is among the major influences, the type of feedback and the way it is given can be differentially effective. A model of feedback is then proposed that identifies the particular properties and circumstances that make it effective, and some typically thorny issues are discussed, including the timing of feedback and the effects of positive and negative feedback. Finally, this analysis is used to suggest ways in which feedback can be used to enhance its effectiveness in classrooms.
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