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dc.contributor.authorAndrew, NE
dc.contributor.authorKilkenny, MF
dc.contributor.authorNaylor, R
dc.contributor.authorPurvis, T
dc.contributor.authorCadilhac, DA
dc.date.available2016-09-08T08:18:09Z
dc.date.issued2015-01-01
dc.identifierpii: ppa-9-1065
dc.identifier.citationAndrew, N. E., Kilkenny, M. F., Naylor, R., Purvis, T. & Cadilhac, D. A. (2015). The relationship between caregiver impacts and the unmet needs of survivors of stroke. PATIENT PREFERENCE AND ADHERENCE, 9, https://doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S85147.
dc.identifier.issn1177-889X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/115967
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Caregivers play a crucial role in meeting the needs of survivors of stroke. Yet, little is known about how they are impacted by their caregiving role. OBJECTIVES: To describe the relationship between survivor long-term unmet needs (>12 months) and caregiver impacts, and identify characteristics that are associated with reported moderate to severe impacts on caregivers. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional survey using data from the Australian Stroke Survivor and Carer Needs Survey. Community dwelling adults 12+ months poststroke and their caregivers participated. Caregivers and survivors were asked about the extent to which the domains of work, leisure and family, and friend and spousal relationships had been impacted using a Likert scale of responses. The extent to which survivor needs were being met was measured over the domains of health, everyday living, work, leisure, and finances, and the total number of unmet needs was calculated. The association between survivor unmet needs and caregiver impacts was assessed using multivariable logistic regression adjusted for caregiver and survivor characteristics. RESULTS: Of the 738 completed survivor surveys, 369 contained matched caregiver data (survivors: median age, 71 years; 67% male) (caregivers: median age, 64 years; 26% male). For caregivers, the domains of work, leisure, and friendships were most impacted. The odds of a caregiver experiencing moderate to extreme impacts increased with the number of reported survivor unmet needs. This was greatest for spousal (aOR [adjusted odds ratio]: 1.14; 95% CI [confidence interval]: 1.07, 1.21; P<0.001) and friend relationships (aOR: 1.14; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.21; P<0.001). Caring for a survivor who needed daily living assistance was associated with moderate to extreme caregiver impacts across all domains. CONCLUSION: Caregivers of survivors of stroke experience large negative impacts, the extent to which is associated with survivors unmet needs. Targeted, long-term solutions are needed to support survivors and caregivers living in the community.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherDOVE MEDICAL PRESS LTD
dc.titleThe relationship between caregiver impacts and the unmet needs of survivors of stroke
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.2147/PPA.S85147
melbourne.affiliation.departmentRadiology
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMedicine (Austin & Northern Health)
melbourne.source.titlePATIENT PREFERENCE AND ADHERENCE
melbourne.source.volume9
dc.rights.licenseCC BY-NC
melbourne.elementsid987620
melbourne.openaccess.pmchttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4524576
melbourne.contributor.authorCadilhac, Dominique
melbourne.contributor.authorKilkenny, Monique
dc.identifier.eissn1177-889X
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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