Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDadvand, Babak
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T07:43:16Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T07:43:16Z
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/129684
dc.description© 2017 Dr. Babak Dadvand
dc.description.abstractThis research project is an interdisciplinary study that draws upon on-going discussions and emerging scholarship in the fields of Citizenships Studies, Education and Sociology of Youth to offer a renewed perspective on how young people experience citizenship through their everyday social encounters in schools and classrooms. More specifically, this study looks into young people’s everyday school practices to: a) offer a situated account of how those who face various sources of marginalization experience participatory citizenship, and b) examine the factors, both in the students’ backgrounds and within the social geography of the school, that contribute to such experiences. The research is an ethnographic study with 12 students who attended an alternative education program in a metropolitan school located in a low socio-economic status suburb of Melbourne, Victoria. Findings from the data gathered over eight months from participant observation, focus group discussions and semi-structured interviews with the students, some of their teachers and the school principal highlighted a set of factors behind young people’s political experiences on the margins of the mainstream school. These factors include: school belonging, inclusion, relationality, recognition of difference, student voice and school discipline. Drawing on the students’ narratives and experiences, I argue that rather than offering a level playing field in which all young people have the opportunity to participate, the social geographies of schools emerging under neoliberal policy reforms tend to differentiate among students on the basis of how well they can satisfy the needs and requirements of the institution in terms of performance and benchmarking. What follows from this process of differentiation, which revolves around the normative definition of ‘good student’ as a self-reliant and high performing individual learner, is the construction of ‘the other’ who lacks the dispositions of the socially sanctioned ‘norm’, and is, therefore, positioned and treated differently in the social field of schools and classrooms. I conclude my thesis by calling for a conceptually comprehensive understanding of youth citizenship that takes into account the complex interactions and overlapping relationships among the elements that constitute youth politics. Within such a conception, all the factors that impact on the political geographies of young people such as belonging, inclusion, relationality, recognition of difference, voice and discipline stand in continuous and dynamic interaction with each other. As I further argue, to create a truly democratic education that is inclusive of all students regardless of their needs and social backgrounds, we should bring issues of social justice centre-stage in our debates about civics and citizenship education.en_US
dc.rightsTerms and Conditions: Copyright in works deposited in Minerva Access is retained by the copyright owner. The work may not be altered without permission from the copyright owner. Readers may only download, print and save electronic copies of whole works for their own personal non-commercial use. Any use that exceeds these limits requires permission from the copyright owner. Attribution is essential when quoting or paraphrasing from these works.
dc.subjectbelongingen_US
dc.subjectcitizenshipen_US
dc.subjecteducation policyen_US
dc.subjectinclusionen_US
dc.subjectmarginalizationen_US
dc.subjectparticipationen_US
dc.subjectrelationalityen_US
dc.subjectschoolsen_US
dc.subjectsocial disadvantageen_US
dc.subjectvoiceen_US
dc.subjectyouth sociologyen_US
dc.titleParticipation on the margins: young people’s citizenship experiences in schoolsen_US
dc.typePhD thesisen_US
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne Graduate School of Education
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMelbourne Graduate School of Education
melbourne.thesis.supervisornameJohanna Wyn
melbourne.contributor.authorDadvand, Babak
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record