Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMoore-Gilbert, Kylie
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-21T02:09:08Z
dc.date.available2019-09-21T02:09:08Z
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/192342
dc.description© 2017 Dr. Kylie Moore-Gilbert
dc.description.abstractThis thesis considers the impact of Bahrain’s 2011 Arab Spring uprising on the political participation of the country’s Shiʿi community, a ‘marginalised majority’ whose engagement has historically shifted in response to cycles of repression and liberalisation manifest within the political system. With a particular focus on the most recent cycle of contention in Bahrain, this thesis makes the case that the ‘National Action Charter’ decade of 2000-2010 effectively transformed Bahrain into a liberalised autocracy, during which the regime exploited divisions between tolerated and antisystem opposition groups to maintain its grip on power whilst promoting its democratising credentials. Drawing on over sixty fieldwork interviews and an innovative content analysis study of the Shiʿi opposition’s online activism, this thesis argues that Bahrain’s Arab Spring protests led to a dramatic shift in both government-opposition and inter-opposition dynamics, resulting in the regime’s transition from liberalised autocracy to full-authoritarianism. Highlighting the growing role of youth activism and online political participation during Bahrain’s five year period of post-Arab Spring authoritarian transition, this thesis demonstrates that the recent proliferation of new media technologies in Bahrain has amplified the Shiʿi opposition’s ability to mobilise and communicate with supporters, bolstering antisystem groups at the expense of the tolerated opposition. More broadly, this thesis provides an important and timely case study of the impact of structural changes within authoritarian regimes on citizen political participation, and ultimately calls into question assumptions surrounding political quiescence and monarchical stability in the resource-rich Arab Gulf.en_US
dc.rightsTerms and Conditions: Copyright in works deposited in Minerva Access is retained by the copyright owner. The work may not be altered without permission from the copyright owner. Readers may only download, print and save electronic copies of whole works for their own personal non-commercial use. Any use that exceeds these limits requires permission from the copyright owner. Attribution is essential when quoting or paraphrasing from these works.
dc.subjectBahrainen_US
dc.subjectArab Springen_US
dc.subjectArab uprisingsen_US
dc.subjectliberalised autocracyen_US
dc.subjectauthoritarianismen_US
dc.subjectpolitical Shiʿismen_US
dc.subjectpolitical Islamen_US
dc.titleShiʿi opposition and authoritarian transition in contemporary Bahrain: the shifting political participation of a marginalised majorityen_US
dc.typePhD thesisen_US
melbourne.affiliation.departmentAsia Institute
melbourne.affiliation.facultyArts
melbourne.thesis.supervisornameMuhammad Kamal
melbourne.contributor.authorMoore-Gilbert, Kylie
melbourne.accessrightsThis item is embargoed and will be available on 2021-09-21.


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record