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dc.contributor.authorLambert, SD
dc.contributor.authorPallant, JF
dc.contributor.authorClover, K
dc.contributor.authorBritton, B
dc.contributor.authorKing, MT
dc.contributor.authorCarter, G
dc.date.available2019-01-07T00:20:02Z
dc.date.available2014-03-18
dc.date.available2014-03-18
dc.date.available2014-03-18
dc.date.available2014-03-18
dc.date.available2014-03-18
dc.date.issued2014-10-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000341820000010&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=d4d813f4571fa7d6246bdc0dfeca3a1c
dc.identifier.citationLambert, S. D., Pallant, J. F., Clover, K., Britton, B., King, M. T. & Carter, G. (2014). Using Rasch analysis to examine the distress thermometer's cut-off scores among a mixed group of patients with cancer. QUALITY OF LIFE RESEARCH, 23 (8), pp.2257-2265. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11136-014-0673-0.
dc.identifier.issn0962-9343
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/219784
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The distress thermometer (DT) is commonly used in cancer care to improve detection of distress. The DT's recommended cut-off score of 4 or 5 has typically been established using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The present analysis complements these studies by critically examining the use of the HADS to identify the DT's cut-off score and corroborating the DT's cut-off scores using item response theory (Rasch analysis). METHODS: The DT and HADS were completed by 340 patients with cancer. Rasch dimensionality analysis was performed on the HADS-Total, and test characteristic curves were examined to equate the DT and the HADS subscales. Identified DT cut-off scores were then examined for their sensitivity and specificity. RESULTS: Rasch analysis did not support the unidimensionality of HADS-Total. The test characteristic curves indicated that a cut-off score of ≥8 on the HADS-Anxiety and HADS-Depression subscales was equivalent to a score of 6 and 7 on the DT, respectively. However, a DT cut-off score of 5 resulted in the best balance between sensitivity and specificity across the HADS-Anxiety and HADS-Depression subscales. CONCLUSIONS: Despite being a popular practice, the present findings did not support combining the HADS-Anxiety and HADS-Depression subscales to identify the DT's cut-off score. Furthermore, these results inform the use of the DT as a preliminary screening tool and suggest that when a single screen is used, a DT cut-off score of 6 or 7 might be more appropriate than the typical cut-off score of 4.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherSPRINGER
dc.titleUsing Rasch analysis to examine the distress thermometer's cut-off scores among a mixed group of patients with cancer
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11136-014-0673-0
melbourne.affiliation.departmentRural Health
melbourne.source.titleQUALITY OF LIFE RESEARCH
melbourne.source.volume23
melbourne.source.issue8
melbourne.source.pages2257-2265
melbourne.elementsid730813
melbourne.contributor.authorPallant, Julie
dc.identifier.eissn1573-2649
pubs.acceptance.date2014-03-18
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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