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dc.contributor.authorKrause, AEen_US
dc.contributor.authorNorth, ACen_US
dc.contributor.authorDavidson, JWen_US
dc.date.available2019-03-08T04:53:31Z
dc.date.available2019-02-11en_US
dc.date.available2019-02-11en_US
dc.date.issued2019-03-01en_US
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000460024000001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=d4d813f4571fa7d6246bdc0dfeca3a1cen_US
dc.identifierARTN 405en_US
dc.identifier.citationKrause, AE; North, AC; Davidson, JW, Using Self-Determination Theory to Examine Musical Participation and Well-Being, FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY, 2019, 10en_US
dc.identifier.issn1664-1078en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/221368
dc.description.abstractA recent surge of research has begun to examine music participation and well-being; however, a particular challenge with this work concerns theorizing around the associated well-being benefits of musical participation. Thus, the current research used Self-Determination Theory to consider the potential associations between basic psychological needs (competence, relatedness, and autonomy), self-determined autonomous motivation, and the perceived benefits to well-being controlling for demographic variables and the musical activity parameters. A sample of 192 Australian residents (17-85, Mage = 36.95), who were currently participating in a musical activity at the time, completed an online questionnaire. Results indicated that females were more likely to perceive benefits to their well-being; and that how important an individual considers music in their life was positively related to perceived well-being. Importantly, the analyses also revealed that the basic needs of competency and relatedness were related to overall perceived well-being as well as specifically social, cognitive, and esteem dimensions of well-being. Autonomous motivation demonstrated significant associations with both an overall well-being score as well as four of five specific well-being subscales measured. Collectively, the findings indicate that Self-Determination Theory offers a useful theoretical framework to understanding the relationship between musical participation and well-being. Further, the pattern of findings reiterates the positive associations between musical participation and one’s psychosocial well-being, with broad implications for people involved in the facilitation of musical activity.
dc.description.abstractA recent surge of research has begun to examine music participation and well-being; however, a particular challenge with this work concerns theorizing around the associated well-being benefits of musical participation. Thus, the current research used Self-Determination Theory to consider the potential associations between basic psychological needs (competence, relatedness, and autonomy), self-determined autonomous motivation, and the perceived benefits to well-being controlling for demographic variables and the musical activity parameters. A sample of 192 Australian residents (17-85, Mage = 36.95), who were currently participating in a musical activity at the time, completed an online questionnaire. Results indicated that females were more likely to perceive benefits to their well-being; and that how important an individual considers music in their life was positively related to perceived well-being. Importantly, the analyses also revealed that the basic needs of competency and relatedness were related to overall perceived well-being as well as specifically social, cognitive, and esteem dimensions of well-being. Autonomous motivation demonstrated significant associations with both an overall well-being score as well as four of five specific well-being subscales measured. Collectively, the findings indicate that Self-Determination Theory offers a useful theoretical framework to understanding the relationship between musical participation and well-being. Further, the pattern of findings reiterates the positive associations between musical participation and one's psychosocial well-being, with broad implications for people involved in the facilitation of musical activity.
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherFRONTIERS MEDIA SAen_US
dc.titleUsing Self-Determination Theory to Examine Musical Participation and Well-Beingen_US
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00405en_US
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne Conservatorium of Music
melbourne.source.titleFRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGYen_US
melbourne.source.volume10en_US
melbourne.elementsid1379051
melbourne.openaccess.urlhttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00405/full
melbourne.openaccess.pmchttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6407371
melbourne.openaccess.statusPublished version
melbourne.contributor.authorKrause, Amanda
melbourne.contributor.authorDavidson, Jane
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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