Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGreville, Piers
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-21T03:56:27Z
dc.date.available2019-05-21T03:56:27Z
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/224056
dc.description© 2018 Piers Greville
dc.description.abstractFaced with fundamental redrawing of human relationships to the global and local environment, a shift in ways of viewing landscape has precipitated. Broad awareness of biodiversity collapse, urbanization, global warming and the advent of genetic engineering and advances in biological technology has inverted many notions and definitions about the word nature. This, underlined by a revisited pre-colonial historical narrative, particularly across Australia, sustains landscape and nature as urgent topics that need to be dealt with and re-viewed. This practice-led research project investigates the intersections of ecological and cultural environments and how this interrelation can be expounded through the act of painting. The investigation is based largely within a local context of Australian visual art and regional terrains, employing a methodology located at the intersection of postcolonial and post-digital frameworks. Within these frameworks the project interrogates and re-interprets actual and combined landscapes. The project elucidates a contemporary re-imagining of landscape enacted through painting. The final research outcomes are composed of a written dissertation and installation of drawings, painting and spatial work. The work comprising the installation is a direct manifestation of the practice-led research. It is expanded upon in the exegesis section of the dissertation. This set of creative works form part of the argument attending to the central question of my thesis. Combining post-digital and established modes of production, this work seeks to open up a layered space, a visual methodology for re-viewing landscape.en_US
dc.rightsTerms and Conditions: Copyright in works deposited in Minerva Access is retained by the copyright owner. The work may not be altered without permission from the copyright owner. Readers may only download, print and save electronic copies of whole works for their own personal non-commercial use. Any use that exceeds these limits requires permission from the copyright owner. Attribution is essential when quoting or paraphrasing from these works.
dc.subjectarten_US
dc.subjectcontemporary arten_US
dc.subjectpaintingen_US
dc.subjectspatial practiceen_US
dc.subjectpost-digitalen_US
dc.subjectAustralian arten_US
dc.subjectlandscapeen_US
dc.subjectnatureen_US
dc.subjectnature cultureen_US
dc.subjectenvironmenten_US
dc.subjectenvironmentalismen_US
dc.subjectpost-natureen_US
dc.subjectpostcolonialen_US
dc.subjectanthropoceneen_US
dc.subjectdigital sublimeen_US
dc.subjectdigital colonialismen_US
dc.titleFabricated country: re-imagining landscapeen_US
dc.typeMasters Research thesisen_US
melbourne.affiliation.departmentSchool of Art
melbourne.affiliation.facultyFine Arts and Music
melbourne.thesis.supervisornameJon Cattapan
melbourne.contributor.authorGreville, Piers
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record