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dc.contributor.authorRossi, Lucia Lucinda Giuseppina
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-08T02:15:22Z
dc.date.available2020-05-08T02:15:22Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/238757
dc.description© 2019 Lucia Lucinda Giuseppina Rossi
dc.description.abstractThe dominant Western conception of space remains the Cartesian paradigm - despite many possible alternatives. This is further reinforced by ubiquity of perspectival space, and the dominance of photography, which reifies this paradigm. This project investigates the self’s relation to space by examining personal, artistic and social frameworks of experiential observation, in doing so, it seeks to evoke these broader conceptualizations of space. The research firstly establishes a framework of references related to the cosmos, the earth and the solar system, with concepts around locating the body in space, and notions of alignment, movement, distance, scale and pattern. The body of creative works which include site-specific installation, wall painting, drawing, photography and animation, are collectively titled the Gnomon Experiments, and explore various uses of the term ‘gnomon’ which refers to locating ones’ self in space, point-of-view, and alignment. The research also examines the reflexive nature of systems of representation of space such as linear perspective, photography, screen and optics in influencing the expression and experience of space, through the theories of Erwin Panofsky and Vilem Flusser who respectively examine these ‘learnt perceptions’ as ideologies encoded with complex symbols and metacodes. This research investigates the possible applications, implications and readings these ideologies might have in spatial arts practice and other works that engage the embodied experience of the viewer. Using various techniques of merging the appearance of two and three-dimensional space the artist endeavours to understand how photography influences spatial practice even in the absence of lens or print. Many of the works incorporate visual illusions and anamorphic distortions where movement and the embodied experience of the participant activates the work. The work questions how we come to feel located in space, and how we construct a sense of space not just around us, but from within us. The project culminates in a minimalist room scaled installation that embodies spatial experience. The percentage split of this research is 75% creative practice, and 25% written dissertation.
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dc.subjectspace
dc.subjectembodied
dc.subjectperception
dc.subjectphotography
dc.subjectperspective
dc.subjectcosmos
dc.subjectgnomon
dc.subjectalignment
dc.subjectanalemma
dc.subjectsun
dc.subjectframe of reference
dc.subjectCartesian
dc.subjectpainting
dc.subjectinstallation
dc.subjectdrawing
dc.subjectillusion
dc.subjectanamorphic
dc.subjectminimalist
dc.subjectgeometric
dc.subjectabstraction
dc.subjectpattern
dc.subjectvoid
dc.subjecttriangle
dc.subjectline
dc.subjectoptics
dc.subjectlens
dc.subjectenergy
dc.subjectdimension
dc.subjectphenomena
dc.subjectvisual
dc.titleThe Presence of Space: Embodiment, Vision, and Art
dc.typeMasters Research thesis
melbourne.affiliation.departmentVictorian College of the Arts
melbourne.affiliation.facultyFine Arts and Music
melbourne.thesis.supervisornameStephen Haley
melbourne.contributor.authorRossi, Lucia Lucinda Giuseppina
melbourne.thesis.supervisorothernameSean Lowry
melbourne.tes.fieldofresearch1360602 Fine arts
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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