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dc.contributor.authorMendis, GDC
dc.contributor.authorBerecki, G
dc.contributor.authorMorrisroe, E
dc.contributor.authorPachernegg, S
dc.contributor.authorLi, M
dc.contributor.authorVarney, M
dc.contributor.authorOsborne, PB
dc.contributor.authorReid, CA
dc.contributor.authorHalgamuge, S
dc.contributor.authorPetrou, S
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-21T03:57:17Z
dc.date.available2020-05-21T03:57:17Z
dc.date.issued2019-01-15
dc.identifierpii: 10.1038/s41598-018-37138-w
dc.identifier.citationMendis, G. D. C., Berecki, G., Morrisroe, E., Pachernegg, S., Li, M., Varney, M., Osborne, P. B., Reid, C. A., Halgamuge, S. & Petrou, S. (2019). Discovering the pharmacodynamics of conolidine and cannabidiol using a cultured neuronal network based workflow. SCIENTIFIC REPORTS, 9 (1), https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-37138-w.
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/239171
dc.description.abstractDetermining the mechanism of action (MOA) of novel or naturally occurring compounds mostly relies on assays tailored for individual target proteins. Here we explore an alternative approach based on pattern matching response profiles obtained using cultured neuronal networks. Conolidine and cannabidiol are plant-derivatives with known antinociceptive activity but unknown MOA. Application of conolidine/cannabidiol to cultured neuronal networks altered network firing in a highly reproducible manner and created similar impact on network properties suggesting engagement with a common biological target. We used principal component analysis (PCA) and multi-dimensional scaling (MDS) to compare network activity profiles of conolidine/cannabidiol to a series of well-studied compounds with known MOA. Network activity profiles evoked by conolidine and cannabidiol closely matched that of ω-conotoxin CVIE, a potent and selective Cav2.2 calcium channel blocker with proposed antinociceptive action suggesting that they too would block this channel. To verify this, Cav2.2 channels were heterologously expressed, recorded with whole-cell patch clamp and conolidine/cannabidiol was applied. Remarkably, conolidine and cannabidiol both inhibited Cav2.2, providing a glimpse into the MOA that could underlie their antinociceptive action. These data highlight the utility of cultured neuronal network-based workflows to efficiently identify MOA of drugs in a highly scalable assay.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherNATURE PUBLISHING GROUP
dc.titleDiscovering the pharmacodynamics of conolidine and cannabidiol using a cultured neuronal network based workflow
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-018-37138-w
melbourne.affiliation.departmentFlorey Department of Neuroscience and Mental Health
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMedicine and Radiology
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne School of Population and Global Health
melbourne.affiliation.departmentAnatomy and Neuroscience
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMechanical Engineering
melbourne.source.titleSCIENTIFIC REPORTS
melbourne.source.volume9
melbourne.source.issue1
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1366282
melbourne.openaccess.pmchttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6333801
melbourne.contributor.authorPetrou, Steven
melbourne.contributor.authorReid, Christopher
melbourne.contributor.authorHalgamuge, Saman
melbourne.contributor.authorOsborne, Peregrine
melbourne.contributor.authorBerecki, Geza
melbourne.contributor.authorMorrisroe, Emma
melbourne.contributor.authorLi, Melody
dc.identifier.eissn2045-2322
melbourne.conference.locationEngland
pubs.acceptance.date2018-11-15
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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