Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPierce, D
dc.contributor.authorGunn, J
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-18T03:53:51Z
dc.date.available2020-09-18T03:53:51Z
dc.date.issued2007-04-25
dc.identifierpii: 1471-2296-8-24
dc.identifier.citationPierce, D. & Gunn, J. (2007). GPs' use of problem solving therapy for depression: a qualitative study of barriers to and enablers of evidence based care. BMC FAMILY PRACTICE, 8 (1), https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2296-8-24.
dc.identifier.issn1471-2296
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/242519
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Depression is a major health concern, predominantly treated by general practitioners (GPs). Problem solving therapy (PST) is recognised as an effective treatment for depression that is not widely used by GPs. This research aims to explore barriers and enablers that may influence GPs use of this treatment. METHOD: Qualitative methodology was used including individual and focus group interviews of GPs, PST experts and consumers. Analysis was undertaken using the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) as a framework. RESULTS: A spectrum of potential influences, on GPs' use of PST emerged. Both barriers and enablers were identified. PST was perceived as being close to current practice approaches and potentially beneficial to both doctor and patient. In addition to a broadly positive attitude to PST, expressed by those with previous experience of its use, potential solutions to perceived barriers emerged. By contrast some GPs expressed fear that the use of PST would result in loss of doctor control of consultations and associated potential adverse patient outcomes. Patient expectations, which emerged as not always coinciding with GPs' perception of those expectations, were identified as a potential influence on GPs' decision concerning adoption of PST. In addition specific factors, including GP skill and confidence, consultation time constraints and technical issues related to PST were noted as potential concerns. CONCLUSION: This research contributes to our knowledge of the factors that may influence GPs' decisions regarding use of PST as a treatment for depression. It recognises both barriers and enablers. It suggests that for many GPs, PST is viewed in a positive light, providing encouragement to those seeking to increase the provision of PST by GPs. In identifying a number of potential barriers, along with associated options to address many of these barriers, it provides insights which may assist in the planning of GP training in PST.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherBIOMED CENTRAL LTD
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleGPs' use of problem solving therapy for depression: a qualitative study of barriers to and enablers of evidence based care
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2296-8-24
melbourne.affiliation.departmentRural Clinical School
melbourne.source.titleBMC Family Practice
melbourne.source.volume8
melbourne.source.issue1
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid284974
melbourne.contributor.authorPierce, David
melbourne.contributor.authorGunn, Jane
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2296
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record