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dc.contributor.authorLythgo, N
dc.contributor.authorEser, P
dc.contributor.authorde Groot, P
dc.contributor.authorGalea, M
dc.date.available2014-05-21T18:53:00Z
dc.date.issued2009-01-01
dc.identifierpii: CPF834
dc.identifier.citationLythgo, N., Eser, P., de Groot, P. & Galea, M. (2009). Whole-body vibration dosage alters leg blood flow. CLINICAL PHYSIOLOGY AND FUNCTIONAL IMAGING, 29 (1), pp.53-59. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1475-097X.2008.00834.x.
dc.identifier.issn1475-0961
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/25084
dc.descriptionC1 - Journal Articles Refereed
dc.description.abstractThe effect of whole-body vibration dosage on leg blood flow was investigated. Nine healthy young adult males completed a set of 14 random vibration and non-vibration exercise bouts whilst squatting on a Galileo 900 plate. Six vibration frequencies ranging from 5 to 30 Hz (5 Hz increments) were used in combination with a 2.5 mm and 4.5 mm amplitude to produce twelve 1-min vibration bouts. Subjects also completed two 1-min bouts where no vibration was applied. Systolic and diastolic diameters of the common femoral artery and blood cell velocity were measured by an echo Doppler ultrasound in a standing or rest condition prior to the bouts and during and after each bout. Repeated measures MANOVAs were used in the statistical analysis. Compared with the standing condition, the exercise bouts produced a four-fold increase in mean blood cell velocity (P<0.001) and a two-fold increase in peak blood cell velocity (P<0.001). Compared to the non-vibration bouts, frequencies of 10-30 Hz increased mean blood cell velocity by approximately 33% (P<0.01) whereas 20-30 Hz increased peak blood cell velocity by approximately 27% (P<0.01). Amplitude was additive to frequency but only achieved significance at 30 Hz (P<0.05). Compared with the standing condition, squatting alone produced significant increases in mean and peak blood cell velocity (P<0.001). The results show leg blood flow increased during the squat or non-vibration bouts and systematically increased with frequency in the vibration bouts.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC
dc.subjectexercise physiology
dc.subjectbiomechanics
dc.subjectbiological sciences
dc.subjectclinical health
dc.subjectorgans
dc.subjectdiseases and abnormal conditions
dc.subjectblood flow response
dc.subjectvibration
dc.subjectDoppler ultrasound
dc.subjectcommon femoral artery
dc.subjectisometric squat
dc.titleWhole-body vibration dosage alters leg blood flow
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1475-097X.2008.00834.x
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Reviewed
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourne
melbourne.affiliation.departmentPhysiotherapy
melbourne.source.titleCLINICAL PHYSIOLOGY AND FUNCTIONAL IMAGING
melbourne.source.volume29
melbourne.source.issue1
melbourne.source.pages53-59
dc.research.codefor110602
dc.research.coderfcd321401
dc.research.coderfcd321402
dc.research.codeseo1998780105
dc.research.codeseo2008920199
melbourne.publicationid112180
melbourne.elementsid307419
melbourne.contributor.authorLythgo, Noel
melbourne.contributor.authorGalea, Mary
melbourne.contributor.authorESER, PRISCA
dc.identifier.eissn1475-097X
melbourne.accessrightsThis item is currently not available from this repository


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