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dc.contributor.authorZoghi, M
dc.contributor.authorHafezi, P
dc.contributor.authorAmatya, B
dc.contributor.authorKhan, F
dc.contributor.authorGalea, MP
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T03:54:18Z
dc.date.available2020-11-17T03:54:18Z
dc.date.issued2020-08-24
dc.identifier.citationZoghi, M., Hafezi, P., Amatya, B., Khan, F. & Galea, M. P. (2020). Intracortical Circuits in the Contralesional Primary Motor Cortex in Patients With Chronic Stroke After Botulinum Toxin Type A Injection: Case Studies. FRONTIERS IN HUMAN NEUROSCIENCE, 14, https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2020.00342.
dc.identifier.issn1662-5161
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/251635
dc.description.abstractSpasticity and motor recovery are both related to neural plasticity after stroke. A balance of activity in the primary motor cortex (M1) in both hemispheres is essential for functional recovery. In this study, we assessed the intracortical inhibitory and facilitatory circuits in the contralesional M1 area in four patients with severe upper limb spasticity after chronic stroke and treated with botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A) injection and 12 weeks of upper limb rehabilitation. There was little to no change in the level of spasticity post-injection, and only one participant experienced a small improvement in arm function. All reported improvements in quality of life. However, the levels of intracortical inhibition and facilitation in the contralesional hemisphere were different at baseline for all four participants, and there was no clear pattern in the response to the intervention. Further investigation is needed to understand how BoNT-A injections affect inhibitory and facilitatory circuits in the contralesional hemisphere, the severity of spasticity, and functional improvement.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherFRONTIERS MEDIA SA
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleIntracortical Circuits in the Contralesional Primary Motor Cortex in Patients With Chronic Stroke After Botulinum Toxin Type A Injection: Case Studies
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fnhum.2020.00342
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMedicine (RMH)
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titleFrontiers in Human Neuroscience
melbourne.source.volume14
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1466714
melbourne.contributor.authorKhan, Farees
melbourne.contributor.authorGalea, Mary
melbourne.contributor.authorBhasker, Amatya
dc.identifier.eissn1662-5161
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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