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dc.contributor.authorMartelli, F
dc.contributor.authorZuo, Z
dc.contributor.authorWang, J
dc.contributor.authorWong, C-O
dc.contributor.authorKaragas, NE
dc.contributor.authorRoessner, U
dc.contributor.authorRupasinghe, T
dc.contributor.authorVenkatachalam, K
dc.contributor.authorPerry, T
dc.contributor.authorBellen, HJ
dc.contributor.authorBatterham, P
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T03:55:08Z
dc.date.available2020-11-17T03:55:08Z
dc.date.issued2020-10-13
dc.identifierpii: 2011828117
dc.identifier.citationMartelli, F., Zuo, Z., Wang, J., Wong, C. -O., Karagas, N. E., Roessner, U., Rupasinghe, T., Venkatachalam, K., Perry, T., Bellen, H. J. & Batterham, P. (2020). Low doses of the neonicotinoid insecticide imidacloprid induce ROS triggering neurological and metabolic impairments in Drosophila. PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, 117 (41), pp.25840-25850. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2011828117.
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/251640
dc.description.abstractDeclining insect population sizes are provoking grave concern around the world as insects play essential roles in food production and ecosystems. Environmental contamination by intense insecticide usage is consistently proposed as a significant contributor, among other threats. Many studies have demonstrated impacts of low doses of insecticides on insect behavior, but have not elucidated links to insecticidal activity at the molecular and cellular levels. Here, the histological, physiological, and behavioral impacts of imidacloprid are investigated in Drosophila melanogaster, an experimental organism exposed to insecticides in the field. We show that oxidative stress is a key factor in the mode of action of this insecticide at low doses. Imidacloprid produces an enduring flux of Ca2+ into neurons and a rapid increase in levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the larval brain. It affects mitochondrial function, energy levels, the lipid environment, and transcriptomic profiles. Use of RNAi to induce ROS production in the brain recapitulates insecticide-induced phenotypes in the metabolic tissues, indicating that a signal from neurons is responsible. Chronic low level exposures in adults lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, severe damage to glial cells, and impaired vision. The potent antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA), reduces the severity of a number of the imidacloprid-induced phenotypes, indicating a causal role for oxidative stress. Given that other insecticides are known to generate oxidative stress, this research has wider implications. The systemic impairment of several key biological functions, including vision, reported here would reduce the resilience of insects facing other environmental challenges.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherNATL ACAD SCIENCES
dc.titleLow doses of the neonicotinoid insecticide imidacloprid induce ROS triggering neurological and metabolic impairments in Drosophila
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.2011828117
melbourne.affiliation.departmentSchool of BioSciences
melbourne.source.titleProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of USA
melbourne.source.volume117
melbourne.source.issue41
melbourne.source.pages25840-25850
dc.rights.licenseCC BY-NC-ND
melbourne.elementsid1466935
melbourne.contributor.authorRoessner, Ute
melbourne.contributor.authorBatterham, Philip
melbourne.contributor.authorPerry, Trent
dc.identifier.eissn1091-6490
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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