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dc.contributor.authorZhang, JD
dc.contributor.authorSchubert, E
dc.contributor.authorMcPherson, GE
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-25T01:55:19Z
dc.date.available2020-11-25T01:55:19Z
dc.date.issued2020-06-01
dc.identifier.citationZhang, J. D., Schubert, E. & McPherson, G. E. (2020). Aspects of music performance that are most highly related to musical sophistication.. Psychomusicology: Music, Mind, and Brain, 30 (2), pp.64-71. https://doi.org/10.1037/pmu0000252.
dc.identifier.issn0275-3987
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/251873
dc.description.abstractOver the last 2 decades, 5 skills relating to visual (performing rehearsed music, sight-reading), aural (playing by ear, playing from memory), and creative (improvising) aspects of music performance have been defined and investigated. To date, however, there has been little research investigating the relationship between these 5 aspects of performance on general musicianship, and none using psychometric measures. The aim of this study was to empirically investigate this relationship through the use of the Goldsmiths Musical Sophistication Index (Gold-MSI). With the exception of ‘Sight-reading,’ results show that all skills were correlated with musical sophistication, with the ‘Playing by Ear’ skill having the highest correlation (explaining 47.0% of the variance). Further analysis with individual Goldsmiths Musical Sophistication Index subscales revealed specific interrelationships and attributions to Western art music-making practices. For example, the Performing Rehearsed Music skill was predicted by the Musical Training, Emotions, and Singing Abilities subscales; Playing by Ear was predicted by the Active Engagement and Singing Abilities subscales; and Improvising was predicted by the Active Engagement subscale. Only Sight-Reading had no significant predictors. The implications for each skill toward current musical training methods is highlighted and discussed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)
dc.languageen
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association (APA)
dc.titleAspects of music performance that are most highly related to musical sophistication.
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/pmu0000252
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne Conservatorium of Music
melbourne.source.titlePsychomusicology: a journal of research in music cognition
melbourne.source.volume30
melbourne.source.issue2
melbourne.source.pages64-71
melbourne.identifier.arcDP150103330
melbourne.elementsid1426273
melbourne.contributor.authorMcPherson, Gary
dc.identifier.eissn2162-1535
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidAustralian Research Council, DP150103330
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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