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dc.contributor.authorCraig, L
dc.contributor.editorPoff, D
dc.contributor.editorMichalos, A
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-26T00:24:23Z
dc.date.available2020-11-26T00:24:23Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationCraig, L. (2017). Gender, Economics, and Unpaid Work. Springer.
dc.identifier.isbn9783319235141
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/251914
dc.description.abstractTo understand work from a gender perspective, it is essential to acknowledge and value both paid employment and unpaid work. Paid employment garners wages; unpaid work is the production of goods or services that are consumed by those within or outside a household, but not for sale in the market (OECD 2016). Unpaid work includes housework, home maintenance, gardening, crop growing, and caring for children, elders, and those who are sick or are living with a disability. It is productive activity that contributes to the wealth of nations and the economic welfare and well-being of households, but is not remunerated. Because the distribution of labor reflects and creates financial disparity, how market and nonmarket work is divided by gender is a critical social issue.
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.titleGender, Economics, and Unpaid Work
dc.typeReference Work
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-319-23514-1_291-1
melbourne.affiliation.departmentSchool of Social and Political Sciences
melbourne.source.titleEncyclopedia of Business and Professional Ethics
melbourne.source.pages1-4
melbourne.elementsid1383266
pubs.edition1
melbourne.contributor.authorCraig, Jocelyn
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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