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dc.contributor.authorCowdery, SP
dc.contributor.authorStuart, AL
dc.contributor.authorPasco, JA
dc.contributor.authorBerk, M
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, D
dc.contributor.authorBjerkeset, O
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, LJ
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-26T23:20:48Z
dc.date.available2020-11-26T23:20:48Z
dc.date.issued2021-07-01
dc.identifierpii: S1516-44462020005030203
dc.identifier.citationCowdery, S. P., Stuart, A. L., Pasco, J. A., Berk, M., Campbell, D., Bjerkeset, O. & Williams, L. J. (2021). Mood disorder and cancer onset: evidence from a population-based sample of Australian women. BRAZILIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY, 43 (4), pp.355-361. https://doi.org/10.1590/1516-4446-2020-0932.
dc.identifier.issn1516-4446
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/252194
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: The role of mood disorders in cancer onset is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between mood disorder and incident cancer in a population-based sample of women. METHODS: Data were derived from women aged 28-94 years participating in the Geelong Osteoporosis Study. Mood disorder was identified via Clinical Interview (SCID-I/NP). Cancer data was obtained following linkage with the Victorian Cancer Registry. Demographic and lifestyle factors were self-reported. Nested case-control and retrospective study designs were utilized. RESULTS: In the case-control study (n=807), mood disorder was documented for 18 of the 75 (9.3%) cancer cases and among 288 controls (24.0% vs. 39.3%, p = 0.009). Prior exposure to mood disorder was associated with reduced cancer incidence (OR 0.49, 95%CI 0.28-0.84); this was sustained following adjustment for confounders (ORadj 0.52, 95%CI 0.30-0.90). In the retrospective cohort study (n=655), among 154 women with a history of mood disorder at baseline, 13 (8.5%) developed incident cancer during follow-up, whereas among 501 women with no history of mood disorder, 54 (10.8%) developed incident cancer. Exposure to mood disorder was not associated with incident cancer over the follow-up period (HR 0.58, 95%CI 0.31-1.08, p = 0.09). CONCLUSION: Mood disorder was associated with reduced odds of cancer onset. However, this finding was not supported in the retrospective cohort study. Larger studies able to investigate specific cancers and mood disorders as well as underlying mechanisms in both men and women are warranted.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherASSOC BRASILEIRA PSIQUIATRIA
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
dc.titleMood disorder and cancer onset: evidence from a population-based sample of Australian women
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1590/1516-4446-2020-0932
melbourne.affiliation.departmentPsychiatry
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMedicine, Western Health
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titleRevista Brasileira de Psiquiatria
melbourne.source.volume43
melbourne.source.issue4
melbourne.source.pages355-361
melbourne.identifier.nhmrc299831
melbourne.identifier.nhmrc251638
melbourne.identifier.nhmrc628582
dc.rights.licenseCC BY-NC
melbourne.elementsid1466398
melbourne.openaccess.pmchttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8352740
melbourne.contributor.authorBerk, Michael
melbourne.contributor.authorPasco, Julie
melbourne.contributor.authorWILLIAMS, LANA
dc.identifier.eissn1809-452X
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidNHMRC, 299831
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidNHMRC, 251638
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidNHMRC, 628582
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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