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dc.contributor.authorBROPHY, KJ
dc.date.available2014-05-21T18:54:55Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.citationBROPHY, K. J. (2002). The prose poem: a short history, a brief reflection and a dose of the real thing. Text: Journal of writing and writing courses, 6 (1), pp.1-6
dc.identifier.issn1327-9556
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/25219
dc.descriptionC1 - Journal Articles Refereed
dc.description.abstractThe prose poem arrived as a new self-proclaimed literary form in France, through Charles Baudelaire with his 1861 collection, Petits poèmes en prose. In a preface to one of these small poems he acknowledged Aloysius Bertrand’s Gaspard de la Nuit (1842) as his model. The next generation of French poets, including Mallarmé, Rimbaud and Lautréamont, took up this new form in a spirit of revolt and freedom from the constraining traditions of French verse. Richard Terdiman has written that ‘at just the historical moment when the term “prosaic” was mutating into a pejorative, the prose poem sought to reevaluate the expressive possibilities, and the social functionality, of prose itself’ (Terdiman 261).
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.publisherAustralasian Association of Writing Programs
dc.subjectLiterature Studies not elsewhere classified; The Creative Arts
dc.titleThe prose poem: a short history, a brief reflection and a dose of the real thing
dc.typeJournal Article
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Reviewed
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourne
melbourne.affiliation.departmentCreative Arts
melbourne.source.titleText: Journal of writing and writing courses
melbourne.source.volume6
melbourne.source.issue1
melbourne.source.pages1-6
melbourne.publicationid13120
melbourne.elementsid255501
melbourne.contributor.authorBrophy, Kevin
dc.identifier.eissn1327-9556
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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