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dc.contributor.authorPetrova, V
dc.contributor.authorPearson, CS
dc.contributor.authorChing, J
dc.contributor.authorTribble, JR
dc.contributor.authorSolano, AG
dc.contributor.authorYang, Y
dc.contributor.authorLove, FM
dc.contributor.authorWatt, RJ
dc.contributor.authorOsborne, A
dc.contributor.authorReid, E
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, PA
dc.contributor.authorMartin, KR
dc.contributor.authorGeller, HM
dc.contributor.authorEva, R
dc.contributor.authorFawcett, JW
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-26T23:33:04Z
dc.date.available2020-11-26T23:33:04Z
dc.date.issued2020-11-05
dc.identifierpii: 10.1038/s41467-020-19436-y
dc.identifier.citationPetrova, V., Pearson, C. S., Ching, J., Tribble, J. R., Solano, A. G., Yang, Y., Love, F. M., Watt, R. J., Osborne, A., Reid, E., Williams, P. A., Martin, K. R., Geller, H. M., Eva, R. & Fawcett, J. W. (2020). Protrudin functions from the endoplasmic reticulum to support axon regeneration in the adult CNS. NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, 11 (1), https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-19436-y.
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/252265
dc.description.abstractAdult mammalian central nervous system axons have intrinsically poor regenerative capacity, so axonal injury has permanent consequences. One approach to enhancing regeneration is to increase the axonal supply of growth molecules and organelles. We achieved this by expressing the adaptor molecule Protrudin which is normally found at low levels in non-regenerative neurons. Elevated Protrudin expression enabled robust central nervous system regeneration both in vitro in primary cortical neurons and in vivo in the injured adult optic nerve. Protrudin overexpression facilitated the accumulation of endoplasmic reticulum, integrins and Rab11 endosomes in the distal axon, whilst removing Protrudin's endoplasmic reticulum localization, kinesin-binding or phosphoinositide-binding properties abrogated the regenerative effects. These results demonstrate that Protrudin promotes regeneration by functioning as a scaffold to link axonal organelles, motors and membranes, establishing important roles for these cellular components in mediating regeneration in the adult central nervous system.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherNATURE RESEARCH
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleProtrudin functions from the endoplasmic reticulum to support axon regeneration in the adult CNS
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41467-020-19436-y
melbourne.affiliation.departmentOphthalmology (Eye & Ear Hospital)
melbourne.source.titleNature Communications
melbourne.source.volume11
melbourne.source.issue1
melbourne.source.pages5614-
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1479457
melbourne.openaccess.pmchttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7645621
melbourne.contributor.authorMartin, Keith
dc.identifier.eissn2041-1723
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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