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dc.contributor.authorTembo, MC
dc.contributor.authorHolloway-Kew, KL
dc.contributor.authorBortolasci, CC
dc.contributor.authorSui, SX
dc.contributor.authorBrennan-Olsen, SL
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, LJ
dc.contributor.authorKotowicz, MA
dc.contributor.authorPasco, JA
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-26T23:54:53Z
dc.date.available2020-11-26T23:54:53Z
dc.date.issued2020-09-01
dc.identifier.citationTembo, M. C., Holloway-Kew, K. L., Bortolasci, C. C., Sui, S. X., Brennan-Olsen, S. L., Williams, L. J., Kotowicz, M. A. & Pasco, J. A. (2020). Total Antioxidant Capacity and Frailty in Older Men. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF MENS HEALTH, 14 (5), https://doi.org/10.1177/1557988320946592.
dc.identifier.issn1557-9883
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/252279
dc.description.abstractFrailty, a clinical syndrome characterized by multisystem dysregulation, has been associated with high levels of oxidative stress. We investigated the association between serum total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and frailty in older men. This cross-sectional study included 581 men (age 60-90 years) enrolled in the Geelong Osteoporosis Study. Frailty comprised at least three of unintentional weight loss, exhaustion, low physical activity, slowness, and weakness. Serum TAC was measured by quantitative colorimetric determination and expressed as uric acid equivalents (mM). Relationships between TAC (in SD units) and frailty were explored using multivariable logistic regression models. Sociodemographic, anthropometric, and lifestyle variables were tested as potential confounders and effect modifiers. A sensitivity analysis excluded participants (n = 145) in the upper quartile of TAC, who were likely to have hyperuricemia. Fifty (8.6%) men were frail. There was evidence that higher TAC levels were associated with increased likelihood of frailty (OR 1.34, 95% confidence interval [CI; 0.99, 1.80]), and this was attenuated after adjustment for age and body mass index (BMI; OR 1.26, 95% CI [0.93,1.71]). No effect modifiers or other confounders were identified. The sensitivity analysis revealed a positive association between TAC and frailty, before and after accounting for age and BMI (adjusted OR 1.79, 95% CI [1.01, 3.17] p = .038). These results suggest a positive association between TAC levels and frailty, supporting the hypothesis that this biomarker could be useful in identifying individuals at risk of frailty. We speculate that a milieu of heightened oxidative stress in frailty may elevate the oxidative stress regulatory set point, raising antioxidant activity. This warrants further investigation.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherSAGE PUBLICATIONS INC
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
dc.sourceWorld Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (WCO-IOF-ESCEO)
dc.titleTotal Antioxidant Capacity and Frailty in Older Men
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1557988320946592
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMedicine, Western Health
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titleAmerican Journal of Men's Health
melbourne.source.volume14
melbourne.source.issue5
melbourne.identifier.nhmrc299831
melbourne.identifier.nhmrc251638
melbourne.identifier.nhmrc628582
dc.rights.licenseCC BY-NC
melbourne.elementsid1465594
melbourne.contributor.authorKotowicz, Mark
melbourne.contributor.authorBrennan-Olsen, Sharon
melbourne.contributor.authorPasco, Julie
dc.identifier.eissn1557-9891
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidNHMRC, 299831
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidNHMRC, 251638
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidNHMRC, 628582
melbourne.event.locationParis, FRANCE
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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