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dc.contributor.authorSaxby, K
dc.contributor.authorNickson, C
dc.contributor.authorMann, GB
dc.contributor.authorVelentzis, L
dc.contributor.authorBromley, HL
dc.contributor.authorProcopio, P
dc.contributor.authorCanfell, K
dc.contributor.authorPetrie, D
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-27T00:13:35Z
dc.date.available2020-11-27T00:13:35Z
dc.date.issued2020-04-20
dc.identifier.citationSaxby, K., Nickson, C., Mann, G. B., Velentzis, L., Bromley, H. L., Procopio, P., Canfell, K. & Petrie, D. (2020). The financial impact of a breast cancer detected within and outside of screening: lessons from the Australian Lifepool cohort. AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 44 (3), pp.219-226. https://doi.org/10.1111/1753-6405.12976.
dc.identifier.issn1326-0200
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/252388
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To determine the government and out-of-pocket community costs (out-of-hospital medical services and prescription medicines) associated with screen-detected and community-detected cancers (i.e. cancers detected outside of Australia's organised screening program [BreastScreen]). METHODS: We analyse administrative data on government-subsidised medical services and prescription medicines for 568 Victorian women diagnosed with breast cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Using multivariable regression analysis, we estimate the government and out-of-pocket community costs incurred in the three years after diagnosis for screen-detected cancers and community-detected cancers. Additionally, we estimate the government costs associated with diagnosis within and outside of BreastScreen. RESULTS: Average government costs for breast cancer diagnosis were similar within and outside of BreastScreen [$808 (lower limit 676; upper limit 940) vs $837 (95%CI 671; 1,003) respectively]; however, women with community-detected cancers incurred an additional $254 (95%CI 175; 332) out-of-pocket. Controlling for differences in known cancer characteristics, compared to screen-detected cancers, community-detected breast cancers were associated with an additional $2,622 (95%CI 644; 4,776) in government expenditure in the three years following diagnosis. Adverse cancer characteristics that were more prevalent in community-detected cancers (high grade, lymph node involvement, HER2 positive receptor status) were associated with increased government and out-of-pocket costs. CONCLUSIONS: Community-detected breast cancers were associated with increased government and out-of-pocket costs. Implications for public health: These costs should be considered when evaluating current and alternative breast cancer screening strategies.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWILEY
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0
dc.titleThe financial impact of a breast cancer detected within and outside of screening: lessons from the Australian Lifepool cohort
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1753-6405.12976
melbourne.affiliation.departmentSurgery (RMH)
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne School of Population and Global Health
melbourne.source.titleAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
melbourne.source.volume44
melbourne.source.issue3
melbourne.source.pages219-226
dc.rights.licensecc-by-nc-nd
melbourne.elementsid1445792
melbourne.contributor.authorProcopio, Pietro
melbourne.contributor.authorMann, Gregory
melbourne.contributor.authorNickson, Carolyn
melbourne.contributor.authorPetrie, Dennis
melbourne.contributor.authorVelentzis, Louiza Sofia
melbourne.contributor.authorBromley, Hannah
dc.identifier.eissn1753-6405
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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