Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWalia, AM
dc.contributor.authorFairley, CK
dc.contributor.authorBradshaw, CS
dc.contributor.authorChen, MY
dc.contributor.authorChow, EPF
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-27T00:40:44Z
dc.date.available2020-11-27T00:40:44Z
dc.date.issued2020-08-31
dc.identifier.citationWalia, A. M., Fairley, C. K., Bradshaw, C. S., Chen, M. Y. & Chow, E. P. F. (2020). Disparities in characteristics in accessing public Australian sexual health services between Medicare-eligible and Medicare-ineligible men who have sex with men. AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 44 (5), pp.363-368. https://doi.org/10.1111/1753-6405.13029.
dc.identifier.issn1326-0200
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/252550
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: Accessible health services are a key element of effective human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and sexually transmitted infection (STI) control. This study aimed to examine whether there were any differences in accessing sexual health services between Medicare-eligible and Medicare-ineligible men who have sex with men (MSM) in Melbourne, Australia. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective, cross-sectional study of MSM attending Melbourne Sexual Health Centre between 2016 and 2019. Demographic characteristics, sexual practices, HIV testing practices and STI diagnoses were compared between Medicare-eligible and Medicare-ineligible MSM. RESULTS: We included 5,085 Medicare-eligible and 2,786 Medicare-ineligible MSM. Condomless anal sex in the past 12 months was more common in Medicare-eligible compared to Medicare-ineligible MSM (74.4% vs. 64.9%; p<0.001) although the number of partners did not differ between groups. There was no difference in prior HIV testing practices between Medicare-eligible and Medicare-ineligible MSM (76.1% vs. 77.7%; p=0.122). Medicare-ineligible MSM were more likely to have anorectal chlamydia compared to Medicare-eligible MSM (10.6% vs. 8.5%; p=0.004). CONCLUSIONS: Medicare-ineligible MSM have less condomless sex but a higher rate of anorectal chlamydia, suggesting they might have limited access to STI testing or may be less willing to disclose high-risk behaviour. Implications for public health: Scaling up access to HIV and STI testings for Medicare-ineligible MSM is essential.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWILEY
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0
dc.titleDisparities in characteristics in accessing public Australian sexual health services between Medicare-eligible and Medicare-ineligible men who have sex with men
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1753-6405.13029
melbourne.affiliation.departmentUniversity General
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne School of Population and Global Health
melbourne.source.titleAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
melbourne.source.volume44
melbourne.source.issue5
melbourne.source.pages363-368
dc.rights.licensecc-by-nc-nd
melbourne.elementsid1464261
melbourne.contributor.authorChow, Eric
melbourne.contributor.authorFairley, Christopher
dc.identifier.eissn1753-6405
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record