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dc.contributor.authorNamvar, A
dc.contributor.authorBlanch, AJ
dc.contributor.authorDixon, MW
dc.contributor.authorCarmo, OMS
dc.contributor.authorLiu, B
dc.contributor.authorTiash, S
dc.contributor.authorLooker, O
dc.contributor.authorAndrew, D
dc.contributor.authorChan, L-J
dc.contributor.authorTham, W-H
dc.contributor.authorLee, PVS
dc.contributor.authorRajagopal, V
dc.contributor.authorTilley, L
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-27T00:46:12Z
dc.date.available2020-11-27T00:46:12Z
dc.date.issued2020-09-27
dc.identifier.citationNamvar, A., Blanch, A. J., Dixon, M. W., Carmo, O. M. S., Liu, B., Tiash, S., Looker, O., Andrew, D., Chan, L. -J., Tham, W. -H., Lee, P. V. S., Rajagopal, V. & Tilley, L. (2020). Surface area-to-volume ratio, not cellular viscoelasticity, is the major determinant of red blood cell traversal through small channels.. Cellular Microbiology, 23 (1), https://doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13270.
dc.identifier.issn1462-5814
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/252585
dc.description.abstractThe remarkable deformability of red blood cells (RBCs) depends on the viscoelasticity of the plasma membrane and cell contents and the surface area to volume (SA:V) ratio; however, it remains unclear which of these factors is the key determinant for passage through small capillaries. We used a microfluidic device to examine the traversal of normal, stiffened, swollen, parasitised and immature RBCs. We show that dramatic stiffening of RBCs had no measurable effect on their ability to traverse small channels. By contrast, a moderate decrease in the SA:V ratio had a marked effect on the equivalent cylinder diameter that is traversable by RBCs of similar cellular viscoelasticity. We developed a finite element model that provides a coherent rationale for the experimental observations, based on the nonlinear mechanical behaviour of the RBC membrane skeleton. We conclude that the SA:V ratio should be given more prominence in studies of RBC pathologies.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherWiley
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
dc.titleSurface area-to-volume ratio, not cellular viscoelasticity, is the major determinant of red blood cell traversal through small channels.
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/cmi.13270
melbourne.affiliation.departmentBiochemistry and Molecular Biology
melbourne.affiliation.departmentBiomedical Engineering
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMedical Biology (W.E.H.I.)
melbourne.affiliation.departmentAnatomy and Neuroscience
melbourne.source.titleCellular Microbiology
melbourne.source.volume23
melbourne.source.issue1
dc.rights.licenseCC BY-NC
melbourne.elementsid1466622
melbourne.contributor.authorRajagopal, Vijayaraghavan
melbourne.contributor.authorTilley, Leann
melbourne.contributor.authorDixon, Matthew
melbourne.contributor.authorLee, Vee Sin
melbourne.contributor.authorTham, Wai-Hong
melbourne.contributor.authorBlanch, Adam
melbourne.contributor.authorNamvar, Arman
dc.identifier.eissn1462-5822
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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