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dc.contributor.authorClemens, J
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-30T04:44:22Z
dc.date.available2020-11-30T04:44:22Z
dc.date.issued2020-11-30
dc.identifier.citationClemens, J. (2020). Morbus Anglicus; or, Pandemic, Panic, Pandaemonium. Crisis and Critique, 7 (3), pp.40-61
dc.identifier.issn2311-8172
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/252691
dc.description.abstractMid-17th century England births two fateful new signifiers: pandemic and pandaemonium. Although both words are founded on a Greek root pan, meaning all, neither designate a firm or flourishing polity. The words also retain close etymological, homophonic, and semantic relations to another crucial word of the time: panic. Yet these terms do not simply indicate the destruction or abolition of politics or the political, but rather reconstitute the problem of politics according to a radical paradox. This essay examines the emergence and reconstitution of these signifiers in a philological matrix inflected by plague, civil war, religious violence, scientific inquiry, and monarchical restoration, in order to proffer several theses about their significance and operations in and for politics that subsists beyond the specificities of that site.
dc.publisherCrisis and Critique
dc.titleMorbus Anglicus; or, Pandemic, Panic, Pandaemonium
dc.typeJournal Article
melbourne.affiliation.departmentSchool of Culture and Communication
melbourne.source.titleCrisis and Critique
melbourne.source.volume7
melbourne.source.issue3
melbourne.source.pages40-61
dc.rights.licensePublisher's own licence
melbourne.elementsid1481452
pubs.publisher-urlhttps://www.crisiscritique.org/
melbourne.openaccess.urlhttps://crisiscritique.org/past.html
melbourne.contributor.authorClemens, Justin
dc.identifier.eissn2311-5475
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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