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dc.contributor.authorLau, JSY
dc.contributor.authorSmith, MZ
dc.contributor.authorAllan, B
dc.contributor.authorMartinez, C
dc.contributor.authorPower, J
dc.contributor.authorLewin, SR
dc.contributor.authorMcMahon, JH
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-09T22:28:15Z
dc.date.available2020-12-09T22:28:15Z
dc.date.issued2020-11-10
dc.identifierpii: 10.1186/s12981-020-00321-z
dc.identifier.citationLau, J. S. Y., Smith, M. Z., Allan, B., Martinez, C., Power, J., Lewin, S. R. & McMahon, J. H. (2020). Acceptability, motivation and the prospect of cure for people living with HIV and their healthcare providers in HIV cure-focused treatment interruption studies. AIDS RESEARCH AND THERAPY, 17 (1), https://doi.org/10.1186/s12981-020-00321-z.
dc.identifier.issn1742-6405
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/252974
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Analytical treatment interruptions (ATI) are commonly used clinical endpoints to assess interventions aimed at curing HIV or achieving antiretroviral therapy (ART)-free HIV remission. Understanding the acceptability of ATI amongst people living with HIV (PLHIV) and their HIV healthcare providers (HHP) is limited. METHODS: Two online surveys for PLHIV and HHP assessed awareness and acceptability of ATI, and understanding of the prospect for HIV cure in the future. Responses were collected from July 2017-January 2018. A descriptive analysis was performed and similar questions across the two surveys were compared using χ squared test. RESULTS: 442 PLHIV and 144 HHP completed the survey. 105/400 (26%) PLHIV had ever interrupted ART, 8% of which were in a clinical trial. Altruistic motivations were drivers of participation of PLHIV in cure related research. 81/135 (60%) HHP would support their patients wishing to enrol in an HIV cure-focused trial, but fewer would promote and allow such participation (25% and 31% respectively). Compared to HHP, PLHIV were more likely to believe that an HIV cure would be achievable within 10 years (55% vs. 19%, p < 0.001), had less awareness of ATI (46% vs. 62%, p < 0.001) and were less likely to have had experience of either participation or enrolment in an ATI study (5% vs. 18%, p < 0.001) CONCLUSION: PLHIV were more optimistic about the potential for HIV cure. HHP had more direct experience with HIV cure-focused studies. Educational strategies are required for both groups to increase understanding around ATIs in HIV cure research but should be tailored specifically to each group.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherBMC
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleAcceptability, motivation and the prospect of cure for people living with HIV and their healthcare providers in HIV cure-focused treatment interruption studies
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12981-020-00321-z
melbourne.affiliation.departmentDoherty Institute
melbourne.source.titleAIDS Research and Therapy
melbourne.source.volume17
melbourne.source.issue1
melbourne.identifier.nhmrc1042654
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1479473
melbourne.contributor.authorLewin, Sharon
melbourne.contributor.authorSmith, Miranda
melbourne.contributor.authorLau, Jillian
dc.identifier.eissn1742-6405
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidNHMRC, 1042654
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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