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dc.contributor.authorRobards, F
dc.contributor.authorKang, M
dc.contributor.authorLuscombe, G
dc.contributor.authorHawke, C
dc.contributor.authorSanci, L
dc.contributor.authorSteinbeck, K
dc.contributor.authorZwi, K
dc.contributor.authorTowns, S
dc.contributor.authorUsherwood, T
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-09T22:37:06Z
dc.date.available2020-12-09T22:37:06Z
dc.date.issued2020-11-01
dc.identifierpii: ijerph17218104
dc.identifier.citationRobards, F., Kang, M., Luscombe, G., Hawke, C., Sanci, L., Steinbeck, K., Zwi, K., Towns, S. & Usherwood, T. (2020). Intersectionality: Social Marginalisation and Self-Reported Health Status in Young People. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 17 (21), https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218104.
dc.identifier.issn1661-7827
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/253019
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to measure young people's health status and explore associations between health status and belonging to one or more socio-culturally marginalised group. METHODS: part of the Access 3 project, this cross-sectional survey of young people aged 12-24 years living in New South Wales, Australia, oversampled young people from one or more of the following groups: Aboriginal and or Torres Strait Islander; living in rural and remote areas; homeless; refugee; and/or, sexuality and/or gender diverse. This paper reports on findings pertaining to health status, presence of chronic health conditions, psychological distress, and wellbeing measures. RESULTS: 1416 participants completed the survey; 897 (63.3%) belonged to at least one marginalised group; 574 (40.5%) to one, 281 (19.8%) to two and 42 (3.0%) to three or four groups. Belonging to more marginalised groups was significantly associated with having more chronic health conditions (p = 0.001), a greater likelihood of high psychological distress (p = 0.001) and of illness or injury related absence from school or work (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: increasing marginalisation is associated with decreasing health status. Using an intersectional lens can to be a useful way to understand disadvantage for young people belonging to multiple marginalised groups.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherMDPI
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleIntersectionality: Social Marginalisation and Self-Reported Health Status in Young People
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph17218104
melbourne.affiliation.departmentGeneral Practice
melbourne.source.titleInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
melbourne.source.volume17
melbourne.source.issue21
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1480407
melbourne.contributor.authorSanci, Lena
dc.identifier.eissn1660-4601
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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