Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorStull, AJ
dc.contributor.authorCash, KC
dc.contributor.authorChampagne, CM
dc.contributor.authorGupta, AK
dc.contributor.authorBoston, R
dc.contributor.authorBeyl, RA
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, WD
dc.contributor.authorCefalu, WT
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-09T22:58:57Z
dc.date.available2020-12-09T22:58:57Z
dc.date.issued2015-05-27
dc.identifierpii: nu7064107
dc.identifier.citationStull, A. J., Cash, K. C., Champagne, C. M., Gupta, A. K., Boston, R., Beyl, R. A., Johnson, W. D. & Cefalu, W. T. (2015). Blueberries improve endothelial function, but not blood pressure, in adults with metabolic syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.. Nutrients, 7 (6), pp.4107-4123. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu7064107.
dc.identifier.issn2072-6643
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/253110
dc.description.abstractBlueberry consumption has been shown to have various health benefits in humans. However, little is known about the effect of blueberry consumption on blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity in humans. The present study investigated the role of blueberry consumption on modifying blood pressure in subjects with metabolic syndrome. In addition, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity (secondary measurements) were also assessed. A double-blind and placebo-controlled study was conducted in 44 adults (blueberry, n = 23; and placebo, n = 21). They were randomized to receive a blueberry or placebo smoothie twice daily for six weeks. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity were assessed pre- and post-intervention. The blood pressure and insulin sensitivity did not differ between the blueberry and placebo groups. However, the mean change in resting endothelial function, expressed as reactive hyperemia index (RHI), was improved significantly more in the group consuming the blueberries versus the placebo group (p = 0.024). Even after adjusting for confounding factors, i.e., the percent body fat and gender, the blueberry group still had a greater improvement in endothelial function when compared to their counterpart (RHI; 0.32 ± 0.13 versus -0.33 ± 0.14; p = 0.0023). In conclusion, daily dietary consumption of blueberries did not improve blood pressure, but improved (i.e., increased) endothelial function over six weeks in subjects with metabolic syndrome.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherMDPI AG
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleBlueberries improve endothelial function, but not blood pressure, in adults with metabolic syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/nu7064107
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMedicine (St Vincent's)
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titleNutrients
melbourne.source.volume7
melbourne.source.issue6
melbourne.source.pages4107-4123
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1302096
melbourne.openaccess.pmchttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4488775
melbourne.contributor.authorBoston, Raymond
dc.identifier.eissn2072-6643
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record