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dc.contributor.authorMcCurrie, CH
dc.contributor.authorCrone, DL
dc.contributor.authorBigelow, F
dc.contributor.authorLaham, SM
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-09T23:31:59Z
dc.date.available2020-12-09T23:31:59Z
dc.date.issued2018-11-14
dc.identifierpii: PONE-D-18-07119
dc.identifier.citationMcCurrie, C. H., Crone, D. L., Bigelow, F. & Laham, S. M. (2018). Moral and Affective Film Set (MAAFS): A normed moral video database. PLOS ONE, 13 (11), https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0206604.
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/253250
dc.description.abstractMoral psychology has relied nearly exclusively on text stimuli in the development and testing of theories. However, text stimuli lack the rich variety of morally-relevant social and contextual cues available in everyday interactions. A consequence of this pervasive ecological invalidity may be that moral psychological theories are mischaracterized by an overreliance on cue-impoverished moral stimuli. We address this limitation by developing a cue-rich Moral and Affective Film Set (MAAFS). We crowd-sourced videos of moral behaviours, using previously validated text stimuli and definitions of moral foundations as a guide for content. Crowd-sourced clips were rated by 322 American and 253 Australian participants on a range of moral and affective dimensions, including wrongness, moral foundation relevance, punishment, arousal, discrete emotion-relevance, clarity, previous exposure, and how weird/uncommon the moral acts were. The final stimulus set contained sixty nine moral videos. Ratings confirmed that the videos are reliably rated as morally wrong and feature a variety of moral concerns. The validation process revealed features that make the MAAFS useful for future research: (1) the MAAFS includes a range of videos that depict everyday transgressions, (2) certain videos evoke negative emotions at an intensity comparable to mood induction films, (3) the videos are largely novel: participants had never seen more than 90% of the videos. We anticipate the MAAFS will be a particularly valuable tool for researchers in moral psychology who seek to study morality in scenarios that approximate real-life. However, the MAAFS may be valuable for other fields of psychology, for example, affective scientists may use these videos as a mood induction procedure. The complete stimulus set, links to videos, and normative statistics can be accessed at osf.io/8w3en.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleMoral and Affective Film Set (MAAFS): A normed moral video database
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0206604
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne School of Psychological Sciences
melbourne.source.titlePLoS One
melbourne.source.volume13
melbourne.source.issue11
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1357569
melbourne.contributor.authorLaham, Simon
melbourne.contributor.authorCrone, Damien Lucas
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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