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dc.contributor.authorWaterman, MJ
dc.contributor.authorBramley-Alves, J
dc.contributor.authorMiller, RE
dc.contributor.authorKeller, PA
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, SA
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-09T23:33:19Z
dc.date.available2020-12-09T23:33:19Z
dc.date.issued2018-11-21
dc.identifierpii: 10.1186/s40659-018-0196-1
dc.identifier.citationWaterman, M. J., Bramley-Alves, J., Miller, R. E., Keller, P. A. & Robinson, S. A. (2018). Photoprotection enhanced by red cell wall pigments in three East Antarctic mosses.. Biol Res, 51 (1), pp.49-. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40659-018-0196-1.
dc.identifier.issn0716-9760
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/253257
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Antarctic bryophytes (mosses and liverworts) are resilient to physiologically extreme environmental conditions including elevated levels of ultraviolet (UV) radiation due to depletion of stratospheric ozone. Many Antarctic bryophytes synthesise UV-B-absorbing compounds (UVAC) that are localised in their cells and cell walls, a location that is rarely investigated for UVAC in plants. This study compares the concentrations and localisation of intracellular and cell wall UVAC in Antarctic Ceratodon purpureus, Bryum pseudotriquetrum and Schistidium antarctici from the Windmill Islands, East Antarctica. RESULTS: Multiple stresses, including desiccation and naturally high UV and visible light, seemed to enhance the incorporation of total UVAC including red pigments in the cell walls of all three Antarctic species analysed. The red growth form of C. purpureus had significantly higher levels of cell wall bound and lower intracellular UVAC concentrations than its nearby green form. Microscopic and spectroscopic analyses showed that the red colouration in this species was associated with the cell wall and that these red cell walls contained less pectin and phenolic esters than the green form. All three moss species showed a natural increase in cell wall UVAC content during the growing season and a decline in these compounds in new tissue grown under less stressful conditions in the laboratory. CONCLUSIONS: UVAC and red pigments are tightly bound to the cell wall and likely have a long-term protective role in Antarctic bryophytes. Although the identity of these red pigments remains unknown, our study demonstrates the importance of investigating cell wall UVAC in plants and contributes to our current understanding of UV-protective strategies employed by particular Antarctic bryophytes. Studies such as these provide clues to how these plants survive in such extreme habitats and are helpful in predicting future survival of the species studied.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.titlePhotoprotection enhanced by red cell wall pigments in three East Antarctic mosses.
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s40659-018-0196-1
melbourne.affiliation.departmentSchool of Ecosystem and Forest Sciences
melbourne.source.titleBiological Research
melbourne.source.volume51
melbourne.source.issue1
melbourne.source.pages49-
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1357922
melbourne.openaccess.pmchttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6247747
melbourne.contributor.authorMiller, Rebecca
dc.identifier.eissn0717-6287
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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